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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Cities and towns

Nov 5, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Jill McCorkle's cluster of retirees faces death with humor and sorrow. In nonfiction, Lawrence Wright peeks into the world of Scientology, Simon Garfield charts a history of maps, Jonathan Cott recalls his friendship with John and Yoko, Duncan Wall spins yarns about the circus and Mark Binelli welcomes us to his Detroit.
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Jul 30, 2013 — Millions of people worldwide are leaving rural areas for urban ones. NPR Cities Project editor Franklyn Cater highlights five books that examine and celebrate 21st century life in the metropolis.
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Jul 11, 2013 — Around the world, cities like Rio de Janeiro are using new technologies to solve their problems. And while there's great promise in many of these "smart" city programs, urban planner Anthony Townsend is wary of putting so much power in the hands of tech companies.
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Jan 2, 2013 — Author Mark Binelli knows it isn't all great, but he still claims Detroit City Is the Place to Be. His book takes readers from decay to possibility in a new look at a city we thought we already knew so much about.
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Apr 25, 2012 — Kevin Wilson's "strange and wonderful" debut novel, The Family Fang, arrives, along with Adrian Burgos Jr.'s biography of a colorful Negro League owner, memoirs by hacker Kevin Mitnick and mother of nine Melissa Faye Greene, plus journalist Doug Saunders' look at world migration patterns.
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Mar 24, 2011 — In his new book, Doug Saunders explores how urban immigrant centers function in increasingly subtle ways, and how governments succeed and fail in managing them.
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Feb 8, 2010 — The U.S. population is expected to reach 400 million by mid-century. In his book, The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050, Joel Kotkin argues that future will be green, diverse and suburban. Kotkin explains how the nation's changing demographics will transform American life and communities.
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Feb 2, 2010 — Things fall apart in Louise Erdrich's Shadow Tag. A woman's gift to science yields medical miracles — and outrage — in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. What will America be like with one-third more people? A strangely optimistic answer in The Next Hundred Million. And a teenager traces down a tragic family mystery in The Girl Who Fell from the Sky.
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Dec 26, 2006 — What do Philadelphia, Seattle and Washington D.C., have in common? All are included in David Gilmartin's book The Absolutely Worst Places to Live in America.
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Dec 2, 2005 — With her gift book selections, NPR's Ketzel Levine will take you wandering through old maps and contemporary art galleries, courtside at the NBA, inside the minds of raucous high school kids, and into the embrace of poems.
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