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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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November 1, 2009 | NPR · Every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Rebecca Skloot

Feb 18, 2013 — It was one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research: the immortal HeLa cell line. But few people know the cells belonged to a poor Southern tobacco farmer named Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot spent years researching Lacks and tells her story in The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks.
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Aug 25, 2011 — Many colleges assign books that all incoming freshmen must read over the summer. A popular 2011 assignment is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, about a cell line taken without consent from a black woman with cervical cancer.
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Mar 18, 2011 — In 1951, Henrietta Lacks died after a long battle with cervical cancer. Doctors cultured her cells without permission from her family. The story of those cells and of the medical advances that came from them, is told in Rebecca Skloot's book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
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Mar 9, 2011 — In fiction, Christopher Moore's goth teen countess returns, Ian McEwan merges marriage woes with climate change, and Lionel Shriver takes on the ailing health care system. In nonfiction, Deborah Amos describes the forced migration of Sunnis in Iraq, and Rebecca Skloot tells a story of immortality — of sorts.
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Dec 13, 2010 — It was one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research: the immortal HeLa cell line. But few people know the cells belonged to a poor Southern tobacco farmer named Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot spent years researching Lacks and tells her story in The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks.
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Nov 23, 2010 — Some books aren't just great reads — they're great discussions, too. Critic Heller McAlpin picks the best literary conversation starters of 2010 — guaranteed to give you something to talk about.
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Jun 29, 2010 — Bestsellerdom doesn't necessarily bring with it a promise of quality, so we've hand-selected five titles from the NPR Bestseller List: an acutely observed first novel with satiric punch, three works of fiction from established authors at the top of their game, and a startlingly powerful science thriller from a nonfiction newcomer.
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Feb 2, 2010 — In 1951, Henrietta Lacks died after a long battle with cervical cancer. Doctors cultured her cells without permission from her family. The story of those cells — known as HeLa cells, in Lacks' honor — and of the medical advances that came from them, is told in Rebecca Skloot's book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
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Feb 2, 2010 — Things fall apart in Louise Erdrich's Shadow Tag. A woman's gift to science yields medical miracles — and outrage — in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. What will America be like with one-third more people? A strangely optimistic answer in The Next Hundred Million. And a teenager traces down a tragic family mystery in The Girl Who Fell from the Sky.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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