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August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
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August 1, 2014 | NPR · As the EPA develops new carbon emission rules for existing power plants, the agency is holding a series of public hearings around the country, where coal industry advocates made their concerns known.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne has this morning's business news.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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HeLa cells

Feb 18, 2013 — It was one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research: the immortal HeLa cell line. But few people know the cells belonged to a poor Southern tobacco farmer named Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot spent years researching Lacks and tells her story in The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks.
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Jul 13, 2012 — Rebecca Skloot's study of the life behind the HeLa cell is on the list for a 70th week.
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Aug 25, 2011 — Many colleges assign books that all incoming freshmen must read over the summer. A popular 2011 assignment is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, about a cell line taken without consent from a black woman with cervical cancer.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Mar 18, 2011 — In 1951, Henrietta Lacks died after a long battle with cervical cancer. Doctors cultured her cells without permission from her family. The story of those cells and of the medical advances that came from them, is told in Rebecca Skloot's book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
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Mar 9, 2011 — In fiction, Christopher Moore's goth teen countess returns, Ian McEwan merges marriage woes with climate change, and Lionel Shriver takes on the ailing health care system. In nonfiction, Deborah Amos describes the forced migration of Sunnis in Iraq, and Rebecca Skloot tells a story of immortality — of sorts.
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Dec 13, 2010 — It was one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research: the immortal HeLa cell line. But few people know the cells belonged to a poor Southern tobacco farmer named Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot spent years researching Lacks and tells her story in The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks.
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Nov 23, 2010 — Some books aren't just great reads — they're great discussions, too. Critic Heller McAlpin picks the best literary conversation starters of 2010 — guaranteed to give you something to talk about.
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Jun 29, 2010 — Bestsellerdom doesn't necessarily bring with it a promise of quality, so we've hand-selected five titles from the NPR Bestseller List: an acutely observed first novel with satiric punch, three works of fiction from established authors at the top of their game, and a startlingly powerful science thriller from a nonfiction newcomer.
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Feb 2, 2010 — In 1951, Henrietta Lacks died after a long battle with cervical cancer. Doctors cultured her cells without permission from her family. The story of those cells — known as HeLa cells, in Lacks' honor — and of the medical advances that came from them, is told in Rebecca Skloot's book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
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more HeLa cells from NPR