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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Science

Nov 12, 2013 — Science, politics and policy often make for a wicked mix, says commentator Adam Frank. Understanding each for what it really is should help put us on the path to making better decisions for our future.
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Sep 14, 2013 — The universe is shaped like a vuvuzela. Humans and elephants are the only animals with chins. These, and a trove of other factoids have been compiled in 1,227 Quite Interesting Facts to Blow Your Socks Off — a book by the creators of the hit British television show QI.
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Jul 25, 2013 — When the Isthmus of Panama connected North and South America, two independent dynasties of horses, rhinos, elephants, shrews, weasels, cats and dogs were free to mingle, fight, dominate or die. Who won?
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Apr 26, 2013 — A biologist shares advice on science and life in Letters To A Young Scientist. It debuts at No. 13.
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Apr 14, 2013 — Biologist and Harvard professor Edward O. Wilson has spent his lifetime making scientific discoveries and writing award-winning, best-selling books on science. His new book, inspired by Rainer Maria Rilke's Letters to a Young Poet, gives advice gleaned from his career in science.
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Mar 20, 2013 — Jean-Marie Blas de Robles' novel Where Tigers Are at Home won France's 2008 Prix Medicis. It's now out in English, and reviewer Alan Cheuse says it will appeal to readers who like the complexity of Umberto Eco, with "an adventure plot straight out of Michael Crichton."
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Jan 29, 2013 — Is your Mind real, or just an afterthought in the life of your brain? What if the Mind was something as real as Space and Time and Higgs Bosons?
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Jan 1, 2013 — The discovery of the Higgs boson will likely be hailed as the most important scientific discovery of 2012. But many ideas that change the world don't tend to spring from flashy moments of discovery. Our view of nature — and our technology — often evolve from a sequence of more subtle advances.
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Nov 18, 2012 — Athanasius Kircher, a 17th-century Jesuit priest, was a renaissance man in name and deed. He strove to learn about almost everything. Unfortunately, many of his inventions and theories were pure nonsense. John Glassie writes about Kircher in his new book, A Man of Misconceptions.
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Oct 30, 2012 — Can there be knowledge of right and wrong? Or is the idea that values can be the object of knowledge a grand illusion? Thomas Nagel, in his new book, comes down solidly on one side of this argument. Commentator Alva NoŽ weighs in with his thoughts.
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