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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Science

Nov 12, 2013 — Science, politics and policy often make for a wicked mix, says commentator Adam Frank. Understanding each for what it really is should help put us on the path to making better decisions for our future.
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Sep 14, 2013 — The universe is shaped like a vuvuzela. Humans and elephants are the only animals with chins. These, and a trove of other factoids have been compiled in 1,227 Quite Interesting Facts to Blow Your Socks Off — a book by the creators of the hit British television show QI.
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Jul 25, 2013 — When the Isthmus of Panama connected North and South America, two independent dynasties of horses, rhinos, elephants, shrews, weasels, cats and dogs were free to mingle, fight, dominate or die. Who won?
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Apr 26, 2013 — A biologist shares advice on science and life in Letters To A Young Scientist. It debuts at No. 13.
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Apr 14, 2013 — Biologist and Harvard professor Edward O. Wilson has spent his lifetime making scientific discoveries and writing award-winning, best-selling books on science. His new book, inspired by Rainer Maria Rilke's Letters to a Young Poet, gives advice gleaned from his career in science.
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Mar 20, 2013 — Jean-Marie Blas de Robles' novel Where Tigers Are at Home won France's 2008 Prix Medicis. It's now out in English, and reviewer Alan Cheuse says it will appeal to readers who like the complexity of Umberto Eco, with "an adventure plot straight out of Michael Crichton."
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Jan 29, 2013 — Is your Mind real, or just an afterthought in the life of your brain? What if the Mind was something as real as Space and Time and Higgs Bosons?
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Jan 1, 2013 — The discovery of the Higgs boson will likely be hailed as the most important scientific discovery of 2012. But many ideas that change the world don't tend to spring from flashy moments of discovery. Our view of nature — and our technology — often evolve from a sequence of more subtle advances.
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Nov 18, 2012 — Athanasius Kircher, a 17th-century Jesuit priest, was a renaissance man in name and deed. He strove to learn about almost everything. Unfortunately, many of his inventions and theories were pure nonsense. John Glassie writes about Kircher in his new book, A Man of Misconceptions.
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Oct 30, 2012 — Can there be knowledge of right and wrong? Or is the idea that values can be the object of knowledge a grand illusion? Thomas Nagel, in his new book, comes down solidly on one side of this argument. Commentator Alva No weighs in with his thoughts.
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