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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Translating and interpreting

Oct 28, 2012 — A new book by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche uncovers tales of language and translation, like the story of Peter Less, whose family was killed by the Nazis during the Holocaust. Just a few years later, Less interpreted for those very same people at the Nuremberg trials.
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Oct 15, 2012 — Novelists Aatish Taseer and Naomi Benaron portray life amid sectarian violence in Pakistan and Rwanda, respectively, while Glenn Carle reflects on being a CIA interrogator, novelist Jonathan Lethem explores his influences, and David Bellos probes translation's complexity.
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Nov 14, 2011 — Russian has a word for light blue and a word for dark blue, but no word for a general shade of blue. So when interpreters translate "blue" into Russian, they're forced to pick a shade. It's one of the many complexities of translation David Bellos explores in his new book, Is That a Fish in Your Ear?
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Mar 16, 2011 — Critical darling David Mitchell serves up a screwball tale in a Dutch outpost off Japan in 1799, Sam Lipsyte brings his effortless humor to campus, and China Mieville recounts an epic "squidnapping." Desmond Tutu reflects on forgiveness, and translator Edith Grossman tells of channeling Cervantes.
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Sep 29, 2006 — Qiu Xiaolong's English-language detective stories track Shanghai's transformation into a modern metropolis and how ordinary citizens are struggling to cope with the rapid pace of change.
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May 26, 2006 — Here's a way to travel, without suffering the high prices of fuel these days: Read one of Alan Cheuse's summer reading book picks. One of them is bound to move you someplace beyond your beach chair.
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May 26, 2006 — "In stark and lovely prose, Angela Davis-Gardner creates a believable excursion into the deep heart of a good young woman and her decent but damaged foreign friends," says book critic Alan Cheuse of this novel, one of his summer reading selections for All Things Considered.
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