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August 19, 2014 | NPR · More than one week after the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb, protests continue. On Monday night, police fired tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators.
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · The actions in Ferguson, Mo., have inspired talk about the militarization of U.S. police departments. The real question, is whether police have become militarized in their attitude toward the public.
 
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August 19, 2014 | KHN · Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Medical care

Aug 18, 2013 — Every new generation of immigrants must meet the age-old challenges of building a new home — assimilation and conformity, old habits and new cultures, adjustment and isolation. Author Helene Wecker shares with us three books that explore the complexities of life on foreign shores.
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Jul 7, 2013 — Thousands of soldiers died at the Battle of Gettysburg, but that number might have been higher had it not been for Jonathan Letterman, chief medical officer of the Union's Army of the Potomac. In Surgeon in Blue, Scott McGaugh explores Letterman's long-lasting legacy.
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Aug 7, 2012 — More than 75,000 of you voted for your favorite young-adult fiction. Now, after all the nominating, sorting and counting, the final results are in. Here are the 100 best teen novels, chosen by the NPR audience.
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Jun 22, 2012Destiny of the Republic, about the assassination of President James Garfield, debuts at No. 11.
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Mar 16, 2011 — Are doctors rationing health care? Health policy analyst Gregg Bloche says doctors routinely compromise the principles of the Hippocratic Oath when they decide which expensive tests and treatments they can and can't provide, in order to please lawmakers, lawyers and insurance companies.
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Jan 5, 2011 — In fiction, the old world of ex-pat print journalists in Rome beckons. If you'd rather face the facts, there's unconventional parenting advice or Atul Gawande's prescriptions for modern surgeons. Plus memoirs by novelist Siri Hustvedt and rocker Ozzy Osbourne, and a biography of Warren Beatty.
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Jan 3, 2011 — Writer Kaleb Nation admits that he buys books for their covers — that's why he first picked up Gayle Forman's If I Stay. But he was quickly drawn into the story of Mia, a young cellist who must choose whether to return to her destroyed life, or simply let it all go.
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Sep 9, 2010 — As summer ends, it's time for brainy reads you may have missed in hardcover. Wolf Hall, set in the court of Henry VIII, won the 2009 Booker Prize. Former nun Karen Armstrong takes on the atheists in The Case for God. Barbara Ehrenreich pops the bubble of American optimism with her usual wit — and more.
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Jun 9, 2010 — The genius, if antisocial, protagonist of the Fox series House uses a barrage of cutting-edge tests and procedures to help diagnose his puzzling patients. But how much does that actually cost? We take a close look at one episode to find out.
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Jan 12, 2010 — This week, a novel asks, does God exist? David Malouf reimagines an episode from Homer's Iliad, and surgeon-writer Atul Gawande offers a simple solution for the complicated problem of healing patients. Also, a memoir of life and linguistics in an Amazon tribe.
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