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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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ethics

Mar 1, 2012 — The seemingly intractable differences between liberals and conservatives may have an evolutionary basis, argues Jonathan Haidt in his new book, The Righteous Mind.
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Feb 27, 2012 — Advances in genetic testing have improved the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of disease. In Am I My Genes?, Dr. Robert Klitzman wades through the difficult decisions that come along with having more information about your genetic makeup.
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Dec 8, 2011 — Novelist Ellen Meister explores how a single character might live parallel lives in alternate dimensions, while philosopher Sam Harris explores how science should shape human values. Also, an attempt to re-create the perfect peasant bread, and in-depth profiles of Charles Dickens and Louisa May Alcott.
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Oct 24, 2011 — In a new book, medical ethicist Harriet Washington details how genes and tissues are increasingly being patented by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Those firms, she argues, are focused more on their profits than on the medical needs of patients.
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Mar 16, 2011 — Are doctors rationing health care? Health policy analyst Gregg Bloche says doctors routinely compromise the principles of the Hippocratic Oath when they decide which expensive tests and treatments they can and can't provide, in order to please lawmakers, lawyers and insurance companies.
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Jan 22, 2007 — Rafe Esquith has taught kids from some of the toughest neighborhoods in Los Angeles. His book, 'Teach Like Your Hair's On Fire,' outlines the methods he's found to be successful.
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Sep 24, 2006 — Host Liane Hansen interviews Tom Mullen, author of The Last Town on Earth, a historical novel set in the town of Commonwealth in Washington. The story takes place in 1918 at the height of the flu epidemic and a community gripped by fear tries to prevent an outbreak of the disease by keeping anyone from entering or leaving the town.
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Jan 23, 2006 — An increasingly globalized world presents a dilemma: Accept the values of all cultures or seek a moral code that's absolute? Princeton professor Kenneth Appiah says there is a middle ground. The philosophy, "cosmopolitanism," is the subject of his new book.
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Jan 12, 2005 — Three recent headlines have prompted questions about America's "moral compass": CBS's firings of four staff members over a polically charged story about President Bush's military service during the Vietnam War; the revelation that a black syndicated columnist accepted money to promote a White House program: and the indictment of six businessmen in an AOL billing scandal. NPR's Tony Cox discusses these and other ethical concerns with Rushworth Kidder, founder of the Institute for Global Ethics in Camden, Maine and author of the new book Moral Courage.
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Sep 8, 2004 — In his new book A Matter of Character: Inside the White House of George W. Bush, author Ron Kessler offers a positive portrait of President Bush's leadership. Though Kessler supported Al Gore in the 2000 election, he says he plans to vote for Bush this year. He speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep.
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