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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The end of August heralds the start to the final phase of the 2014 election season. As primaries wrap up and candidates ready themselves for November, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian lays out the political landscape.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Across the nation, state legislators are gearing up for Election Day. And they're well aware that their fates could be tied to national political forces like the president's low approval rating.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Irn Bru is a neon orange soda that inspires passion and may help explain the strong independent streak in Scotland as it prepares to vote Sept. 18 on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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ethics

Mar 1, 2012 — The seemingly intractable differences between liberals and conservatives may have an evolutionary basis, argues Jonathan Haidt in his new book, The Righteous Mind.
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Feb 27, 2012 — Advances in genetic testing have improved the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of disease. In Am I My Genes?, Dr. Robert Klitzman wades through the difficult decisions that come along with having more information about your genetic makeup.
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Dec 8, 2011 — Novelist Ellen Meister explores how a single character might live parallel lives in alternate dimensions, while philosopher Sam Harris explores how science should shape human values. Also, an attempt to re-create the perfect peasant bread, and in-depth profiles of Charles Dickens and Louisa May Alcott.
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Oct 24, 2011 — In a new book, medical ethicist Harriet Washington details how genes and tissues are increasingly being patented by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Those firms, she argues, are focused more on their profits than on the medical needs of patients.
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Mar 16, 2011 — Are doctors rationing health care? Health policy analyst Gregg Bloche says doctors routinely compromise the principles of the Hippocratic Oath when they decide which expensive tests and treatments they can and can't provide, in order to please lawmakers, lawyers and insurance companies.
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Jan 22, 2007 — Rafe Esquith has taught kids from some of the toughest neighborhoods in Los Angeles. His book, 'Teach Like Your Hair's On Fire,' outlines the methods he's found to be successful.
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Sep 24, 2006 — Host Liane Hansen interviews Tom Mullen, author of The Last Town on Earth, a historical novel set in the town of Commonwealth in Washington. The story takes place in 1918 at the height of the flu epidemic and a community gripped by fear tries to prevent an outbreak of the disease by keeping anyone from entering or leaving the town.
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Jan 23, 2006 — An increasingly globalized world presents a dilemma: Accept the values of all cultures or seek a moral code that's absolute? Princeton professor Kenneth Appiah says there is a middle ground. The philosophy, "cosmopolitanism," is the subject of his new book.
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Jan 12, 2005 — Three recent headlines have prompted questions about America's "moral compass": CBS's firings of four staff members over a polically charged story about President Bush's military service during the Vietnam War; the revelation that a black syndicated columnist accepted money to promote a White House program: and the indictment of six businessmen in an AOL billing scandal. NPR's Tony Cox discusses these and other ethical concerns with Rushworth Kidder, founder of the Institute for Global Ethics in Camden, Maine and author of the new book Moral Courage.
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Sep 8, 2004 — In his new book A Matter of Character: Inside the White House of George W. Bush, author Ron Kessler offers a positive portrait of President Bush's leadership. Though Kessler supported Al Gore in the 2000 election, he says he plans to vote for Bush this year. He speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep.
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