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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · After the Liberian government ordered a quarantine of one of the poorest neighborhoods in its capital, Monrovia, residents there woke up to find themselves cut off from the rest of the city by security forces. By midday, the neighborhood was in riot.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Both sides have traded barbs and criticism over the other's policies. Some believe the public feud stems from a personal animosity between President Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Cultural pluralism

Aug 16, 2012 — In fiction, novelists Sebastian Rotella and Tahmima Anam explore cultural frictions along South America's "triple border" and in Bangladesh, respectively. In nonfiction, Jermaine Jackson remembers his brother Michael, and Charles King explores the history of Odessa, Ukraine.
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Feb 27, 2011 — The city of Odessa, on the Black Sea, has packed a lot of history into its few centuries of existence. Author Charles King traces the city's ups and downs in a new book, Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams.
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May 29, 2009 — Renowned scholar and college professor Ronald Takaki has died at the age of 70 after committing suicide. Takaki began his teaching career at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), where he is remembered for being the school's first professor of African-American studies. Larry Hajime Shinagawa, a professor at the University of Maryland, remembers his close friend and mentor.
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Oct 2, 2008 — In this installment of the This American Moment series, Eboo Patel, director of the Interfaith Youth Core, discusses his efforts to promote religious pluralism among young people. Patel believes that this type of mutual respect and understanding is the "big idea of our time."
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Jul 19, 2007 — Author Eboo Patel talks about the hate and rejection he sees in many young religious extremists, and why ignoring the faith line that divides us comes at a huge price.
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Nov 2, 2004 — Who is that person you've passed each day over the last few years, never knowing her name? How do we cross the class and racial boundaries in our neighborhoods and communities? These are some of the questions that Danielle Allen tries to answer in her new book Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship since Brown v. Board of Education. Hear NPR's Tavis Smiley and Allen.
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