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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Cultural pluralism

Aug 16, 2012 — In fiction, novelists Sebastian Rotella and Tahmima Anam explore cultural frictions along South America's "triple border" and in Bangladesh, respectively. In nonfiction, Jermaine Jackson remembers his brother Michael, and Charles King explores the history of Odessa, Ukraine.
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Feb 27, 2011 — The city of Odessa, on the Black Sea, has packed a lot of history into its few centuries of existence. Author Charles King traces the city's ups and downs in a new book, Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams.
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May 29, 2009 — Renowned scholar and college professor Ronald Takaki has died at the age of 70 after committing suicide. Takaki began his teaching career at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), where he is remembered for being the school's first professor of African-American studies. Larry Hajime Shinagawa, a professor at the University of Maryland, remembers his close friend and mentor.
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Oct 2, 2008 — In this installment of the This American Moment series, Eboo Patel, director of the Interfaith Youth Core, discusses his efforts to promote religious pluralism among young people. Patel believes that this type of mutual respect and understanding is the "big idea of our time."
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Jul 19, 2007 — Author Eboo Patel talks about the hate and rejection he sees in many young religious extremists, and why ignoring the faith line that divides us comes at a huge price.
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Nov 2, 2004 — Who is that person you've passed each day over the last few years, never knowing her name? How do we cross the class and racial boundaries in our neighborhoods and communities? These are some of the questions that Danielle Allen tries to answer in her new book Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship since Brown v. Board of Education. Hear NPR's Tavis Smiley and Allen.
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