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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Black humor (Literature)

Aug 2, 2013 — At No. 4, J.K. Rowling's The Casual Vacancy tracks the rapid deterioration of an idyllic community.
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Jul 15, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Chuck Thompson makes the case for Southern secession, and Adam Winkler explores the history of the American gun control battle. In fiction, Rowling tries her hand at a novel for grown-ups.
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Jun 30, 2013 — Novels dealing in privacy-free futures aren't new. But they're rapidly becoming more relevant. Author Max Barry chooses three dystopian novels that are both thought-provoking and chillingly plausible. What's your favorite futuristic novel? Tell us in the comments.
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Jun 17, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Irvine Welsh gives us a prequel to Trainspotting, and Regina O'Melveny tells the story of a 16th-century Renaissance woman. In nonfiction, Dan Ariely discovers what keeps us dishonest.
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Jun 6, 2013 — Also: Orhan Pamuk on the protests in Turkey; Adam Johnson on Kim Jong Il's sushi chef.
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Jan 26, 2013 — In Dave Barry's latest novel, a bachelor dinner goes off the rails, entangling the groom to be with a colorful cast of characters — everyone from Russian mobsters to Haitian refugees to the fourth-place finisher in the Miss Hot Amateur Bod contest. Oh, and an albino Burmese python.
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Jan 5, 2013 — "Today is my birthday. Today I am fifteen. Today I buried my parents in the backyard." So begins Lisa O'Donnell's novel about two sisters who find their parents dead and, instead of reporting it, decide to keep it a secret until they can make it on their own.
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Oct 23, 2012 — Howard Jacobson's new novel, Zoo Time, is the comic tale of a frustrated writer, tormented by the women in his life and struggling to finish his novel in a disintegrating publishing industry. Reviewer Alan Cheuse says the book, sadly, is nowhere near as funny as it's trying to be.
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Oct 11, 2012 — In A.M. Homes' suburbia, yawning sinkholes will suddenly open up in front lawns, swallowing cliched plotlines and opening portals to other dimensions. In her latest novel, she serves up an old-fashioned American story that's more Norman Bates than Norman Rockwell.
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Oct 7, 2012 — When an aspiring writer agrees to look after his old friend's flat, enduring an absent homeowner's passive-aggressive notes isn't the worst that will happen. In his first novel, Care of Wooden Floors, Will Wiles follows a housesitting job gone terribly, terribly wrong.
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