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August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts recently met on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to try to work through issues that have been building up ever since Vladimir Putin returned to the Kremlin.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Turkey

Aug 6, 2014 — Kamila Shamsie's tale of a young Englishwoman's entanglement with the people and mountains of Peshawar is an epic tale stretching from ancient Persia to the waning days of the British Empire.
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Jul 25, 2014 — Scott Anderson's Lawrence in Arabia recounts how a handful of adventurers and low-level officers shaped the Arab Revolt during World War I. It appears at No. 9.
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Aug 19, 2013 — T.E. Lawrence, the British officer who played a key role in the Middle East during World War I, served as one of that war's few romantic champions. Scott Anderson's Lawrence in Arabia explains how Lawrence used his knowledge of Arab culture and medieval history to advance British causes.
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Aug 16, 2013 — Debuting at No. 9, Scott Anderson's Lawrence in Arabia looks back on the Arab Revolt of WWI.
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May 26, 2012 — In Joseph Kanon's new spy thriller, Istanbul Passage, former intelligence aide Leon Bauer is caught in the complexities of post-World War II life, in a story of moral compromise and shifting loyalties.
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Nov 16, 2011 — Comedian Steve Martin tackles the New York art world, while singer Dionne Warwick delivers her life story, music critic Alex Ross charts the evolution of his taste, Jennet Conant explores Julia and Paul Childs' secret World War II spy work, and Michael Korda recounts the life of Lawrence of Arabia.
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Aug 31, 2011 — Child narrators rule this week's fiction: Brock Clarke conjures a young prodigy searching for his father, while Michael David Lukas channels a girl who stows away on a trip to the Ottoman Empire. In nonfiction, Ian Johnson says the CIA inadvertently helped radical Islamists gain a foothold in Europe after World War II.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Gendarme by Mark T. Mustian. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Mar 1, 2011 — It took Michael David Lukas seven years to write his debut novel, The Oracle of Stamboul, but as Martha Woodroof writes, the long struggle was worth it. Woodroof speaks with Lukas about going by three names, the young girl who inspired his novel and going broke for one's writing dreams.
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Dec 10, 2010 — It's that time of year again! Susan Stamberg chats with three independent booksellers about their favorite reads of the year, from an atlas of remote islands to a children's book about feminist heroes.
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