Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts recently met on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to try to work through issues that have been building up ever since Vladimir Putin returned to the Kremlin.
 
NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
Getty Images
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Istanbul (Turkey)

May 26, 2012 — In Joseph Kanon's new spy thriller, Istanbul Passage, former intelligence aide Leon Bauer is caught in the complexities of post-World War II life, in a story of moral compromise and shifting loyalties.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 31, 2011 — Child narrators rule this week's fiction: Brock Clarke conjures a young prodigy searching for his father, while Michael David Lukas channels a girl who stows away on a trip to the Ottoman Empire. In nonfiction, Ian Johnson says the CIA inadvertently helped radical Islamists gain a foothold in Europe after World War II.
Comments |
Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Museum of Innocence by Orhan Pamuk and Maureen Freely. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
Comments |
Mar 1, 2011 — It took Michael David Lukas seven years to write his debut novel, The Oracle of Stamboul, but as Martha Woodroof writes, the long struggle was worth it. Woodroof speaks with Lukas about going by three names, the young girl who inspired his novel and going broke for one's writing dreams.
Comments |
Oct 5, 2010 — It's a seductive week in paperback, with love stories from Nobel Prize-winner Orhan Pamuk and Pulitzer Prize-winner Phillip Roth, and an intimate glimpse into Louis Armstrong's life from Wall Street Journal drama critic Terry Teachout.
Comments |
Oct 27, 2009 — Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk says his new novel is a love story that "doesn't put love on a pedestal." Instead, The Museum of Innocence is about one man's obsession with a beautiful young woman — and the museum collection he dedicates to the affair that derailed his life.
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 10, 2008 — Once charged with — and acquitted of — the crime of "insulting Turkishness," Elif Shafak examines her roots in her new novel, The Bastard of Istanbul, a book
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 6, 2007 — When Elif Shafak's novel The Bastard of Istanbul was published in her home country, the best-selling author was accused of "public denigration of Turkishness." She was eventually acquitted.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 11, 2005 — In his native Turkey, Orhan Pamuk is considered the William Faulkner of contemporary fiction. Frank Browning talks with the writer in Istanbul about his relationship to the ever-changing city and his controversial opinions on Turkey's history.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Istanbul (Turkey) from NPR