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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Islamist extremist group Islamic State has released a new video that purports to show the beheading of an American journalist named Steven Sotloff, whom the group threatened to kill two weeks ago.
 
September 2, 2014 | NPR · In response to unrest in eastern Ukraine, NATO is considering forming a rapid reaction force — a topic that will be discussed at a summit this week in Wales. But how will Russia react, and is this the right move for the alliance? To learn more, Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Pifer, the director of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative at the Brookings Institution.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Pentagon has been transferring mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles to local police. Built to protect U.S. forces from roadside bomb blasts at war, these huge vehicles aren't always welcome.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Istanbul (Turkey)

May 26, 2012 — In Joseph Kanon's new spy thriller, Istanbul Passage, former intelligence aide Leon Bauer is caught in the complexities of post-World War II life, in a story of moral compromise and shifting loyalties.
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Aug 31, 2011 — Child narrators rule this week's fiction: Brock Clarke conjures a young prodigy searching for his father, while Michael David Lukas channels a girl who stows away on a trip to the Ottoman Empire. In nonfiction, Ian Johnson says the CIA inadvertently helped radical Islamists gain a foothold in Europe after World War II.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Museum of Innocence by Orhan Pamuk and Maureen Freely. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Mar 1, 2011 — It took Michael David Lukas seven years to write his debut novel, The Oracle of Stamboul, but as Martha Woodroof writes, the long struggle was worth it. Woodroof speaks with Lukas about going by three names, the young girl who inspired his novel and going broke for one's writing dreams.
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Oct 5, 2010 — It's a seductive week in paperback, with love stories from Nobel Prize-winner Orhan Pamuk and Pulitzer Prize-winner Phillip Roth, and an intimate glimpse into Louis Armstrong's life from Wall Street Journal drama critic Terry Teachout.
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Oct 27, 2009 — Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk says his new novel is a love story that "doesn't put love on a pedestal." Instead, The Museum of Innocence is about one man's obsession with a beautiful young woman — and the museum collection he dedicates to the affair that derailed his life.
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Apr 10, 2008 — Once charged with — and acquitted of — the crime of "insulting Turkishness," Elif Shafak examines her roots in her new novel, The Bastard of Istanbul, a book
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Feb 6, 2007 — When Elif Shafak's novel The Bastard of Istanbul was published in her home country, the best-selling author was accused of "public denigration of Turkishness." She was eventually acquitted.
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Oct 11, 2005 — In his native Turkey, Orhan Pamuk is considered the William Faulkner of contemporary fiction. Frank Browning talks with the writer in Istanbul about his relationship to the ever-changing city and his controversial opinions on Turkey's history.
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