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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Legal status, laws, etc

Oct 11, 2012 — Michael Klarman, a Harvard law professor and former clerk for Ruth Bader Ginsburg, traces the judicial history of gay marriage in America from WWII to the present. According to Klarman, the "handwriting on the wall" indicates the imminent legalization of same-sex marriage.
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Jan 11, 2012 — In Justice and the Enemy, William Shawcross says the Nuremberg trials of Nazi leaders after World War II created a template for the trial of future war crimes. He considers the case of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the alleged mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, who will be tried in a military commission this year.
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Feb 24, 2011 — After the Civil War, the United States seemed poised to grant equal rights to blacks. But the Supreme Court's rulings in the late 19th century kept blacks segregated for decades, says constitutional scholar Lawrence Goldstone.
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Nov 19, 2009 — George Washington University law professor and former prosecutor Paul Butler believes that, in order to fight for justice, Americans must sometimes fight the power of the justice system. He speaks with host Michel Martin about his new book, "Let's Get Free: A Hip Hop Theory of Justice," and his vision for justice policy.
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Jun 30, 2008 — In the upcoming issue of the New Yorker, Seymour Hersh writes that the United States may be closer to armed conflict with Iran than previously imagined.
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Apr 9, 2008 — Murat Kurnaz says he spent five years being tortured and interrogated by U.S. military personnel at Guantanamo Bay — even after intelligence determined that he had no terrorist ties. He discusses his memoir, Five Years of My Life: An Innocent Man in Guantanamo.
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Nov 1, 2007 — Clive Stafford Smith is one of just a few people who've had independent access to the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay. He says countless innocent men have been held there for years with no meaningful review of the accusations against them, often suffering terrible abuse. In Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side, he details life inside the camp.
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Oct 3, 2007 — Sarah Percy, professor of International Relations at Oxford University in England, discusses the kinds of services provided by private security companies like Blackwater USA, and how their rules regarding the use of force apply.
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Jun 13, 2005 — As special master of the Federal Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund, Feinberg decided how much families of the terrorist attacks' victims would receive and which family members were eligible for compensation. He also was on a team that determined the fair market value of the Zapruder film of the Kennedy assassination. Feinberg has written a book about his work on the Sept. 11 Fund, What is Life Worth?: The Unprecedented Effort to Compensate the Victims of 9/11.
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Sep 15, 2004 — Investigative reporter Seymour Hersh was among the first to publish details of the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib in Iraq. In a new book, Chain of Command, Hersh alleges that the Bush administration knew in the fall of 2002 about abuse at the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep.
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