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July 21, 2014 | NPR · Israel warned Palestinian residents days in advance that it planned to attack a Gaza City neighborhood. But in the cramped territory, there are few places for residents to take refuge.
 
July 21, 2014 | NPR · In one Jerusalem suburb, some Israelis wonder whether the ground invasion will achieve the results they are looking for.
 
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July 21, 2014 | NPR · The Florida Republican, with one eye on the White House, tells NPR's Morning Edition that there's a role for government to play in opening access to higher education and job training.
 

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July 21, 2014 | NPR · As the Israeli military expands its assault in the Gaza Strip, casualty numbers continue to grow. At last count, more than 550 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 25 Israeli soldiers have died. On Monday, an Israeli strike hit a hospital in central Gaza, killing people in the intensive care unit.
 
July 21, 2014 | NPR · Violence continues to escalate in the Gaza Strip. According to many foreign observers, Egypt must play a key role in any peace agreement between Israel and Hamas. To find out why, Robert Siegel speaks with Michele Dunne, a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
 
July 21, 2014 | NPR · It's been four years since Dodd-Frank Act was signed into law. On the anniversary of this sweeping overhaul of financial regulations, Republicans have released a report that argues the law falls short on one of its main tasks.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Legal status, laws, etc

Oct 11, 2012 — Michael Klarman, a Harvard law professor and former clerk for Ruth Bader Ginsburg, traces the judicial history of gay marriage in America from WWII to the present. According to Klarman, the "handwriting on the wall" indicates the imminent legalization of same-sex marriage.
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Jan 11, 2012 — In Justice and the Enemy, William Shawcross says the Nuremberg trials of Nazi leaders after World War II created a template for the trial of future war crimes. He considers the case of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the alleged mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, who will be tried in a military commission this year.
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Feb 24, 2011 — After the Civil War, the United States seemed poised to grant equal rights to blacks. But the Supreme Court's rulings in the late 19th century kept blacks segregated for decades, says constitutional scholar Lawrence Goldstone.
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Nov 19, 2009 — George Washington University law professor and former prosecutor Paul Butler believes that, in order to fight for justice, Americans must sometimes fight the power of the justice system. He speaks with host Michel Martin about his new book, "Let's Get Free: A Hip Hop Theory of Justice," and his vision for justice policy.
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Jun 30, 2008 — In the upcoming issue of the New Yorker, Seymour Hersh writes that the United States may be closer to armed conflict with Iran than previously imagined.
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Apr 9, 2008 — Murat Kurnaz says he spent five years being tortured and interrogated by U.S. military personnel at Guantanamo Bay — even after intelligence determined that he had no terrorist ties. He discusses his memoir, Five Years of My Life: An Innocent Man in Guantanamo.
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Nov 1, 2007 — Clive Stafford Smith is one of just a few people who've had independent access to the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay. He says countless innocent men have been held there for years with no meaningful review of the accusations against them, often suffering terrible abuse. In Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side, he details life inside the camp.
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Oct 3, 2007 — Sarah Percy, professor of International Relations at Oxford University in England, discusses the kinds of services provided by private security companies like Blackwater USA, and how their rules regarding the use of force apply.
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Jun 13, 2005 — As special master of the Federal Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund, Feinberg decided how much families of the terrorist attacks' victims would receive and which family members were eligible for compensation. He also was on a team that determined the fair market value of the Zapruder film of the Kennedy assassination. Feinberg has written a book about his work on the Sept. 11 Fund, What is Life Worth?: The Unprecedented Effort to Compensate the Victims of 9/11.
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Sep 15, 2004 — Investigative reporter Seymour Hersh was among the first to publish details of the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib in Iraq. In a new book, Chain of Command, Hersh alleges that the Bush administration knew in the fall of 2002 about abuse at the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep.
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