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April 15, 2014 | NPR · The acting Ukrainian president says his military is advancing against pro-Russian separatists who took over government buildings in eastern Ukraine. The separatists didn't comply with an ultimatum.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · As part of NPR's anniversary coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick about that day.
 
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April 15, 2014 | NPR · The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, NPR's Louisa Lim explains in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Businessmen

Sep 20, 2013Steve Jobs, Walter Isaacson's biography of the eponymous tech icon, appears at No. 7.
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Sep 9, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Walter Isaacson records Steve Jobs' official biography, Salman Rushdie remembers hiding for his life and Lynn Povich describes a revolution at Newsweek. In fiction, Michael Chabon tells the story of a struggling California record store and Junot Diaz explores infidelity.
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Jun 28, 2013 — Dave Eggers sends a businessman to Saudi Arabia in A Hologram for the King, which appears at No. 10.
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Jun 3, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Barbara Kingsolver explores climate change, Jami Attenberg depicts an eating disorder, Dave Eggers sends a businessman to Saudi Arabia, and Vaddey Ratner fictionalizes life under the Khmer Rouge. In nonfiction, Jeffrey Toobin examines the Supreme Court and President Obama.
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Nov 14, 2012 — What are the best of the books? NPR Books looks at this year's National Book Award nominees for fiction and nonfiction. These 10 books — which tell the stories of a young drug smuggler, lovable philanderers, holograms in the Saudi desert and more — inspired, informed and entertained readers.
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Jul 13, 2012 — Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs: A Biography is on the list for a 30th week.
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Jun 29, 2012A Hologram for the King, Dave Eggers' tale of adventure and economic hardship, debuts at No. 5.
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Jun 11, 2012 — Summer is a trying time for introverts, what with the barbecues and the graduations and the picnics by the pool. If you'd always choose a good book over a good party, critic Maureen Corrigan has a list for you.
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May 18, 2012 — Clarence Birdseye's life as a taxidermist, fur trader, hunter, and fish lobbyist all led to his creation of the modern frozen food industry. His inventions made frozen food tastier and more widely available to consumers.
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May 6, 2012 — Before locavores and the "slow food" movement, one man's invention radically transformed how (and what) we eat. In his new book, Mark Kurlansky shows us the curious, roving mind that made TV dinners possible.
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