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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, more than 160 people have been arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Businessmen

Sep 20, 2013Steve Jobs, Walter Isaacson's biography of the eponymous tech icon, appears at No. 7.
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Sep 9, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Walter Isaacson records Steve Jobs' official biography, Salman Rushdie remembers hiding for his life and Lynn Povich describes a revolution at Newsweek. In fiction, Michael Chabon tells the story of a struggling California record store and Junot Diaz explores infidelity.
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Jun 28, 2013 — Dave Eggers sends a businessman to Saudi Arabia in A Hologram for the King, which appears at No. 10.
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Jun 3, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Barbara Kingsolver explores climate change, Jami Attenberg depicts an eating disorder, Dave Eggers sends a businessman to Saudi Arabia, and Vaddey Ratner fictionalizes life under the Khmer Rouge. In nonfiction, Jeffrey Toobin examines the Supreme Court and President Obama.
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Nov 14, 2012 — What are the best of the books? NPR Books looks at this year's National Book Award nominees for fiction and nonfiction. These 10 books — which tell the stories of a young drug smuggler, lovable philanderers, holograms in the Saudi desert and more — inspired, informed and entertained readers.
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Jul 13, 2012 — Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs: A Biography is on the list for a 30th week.
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Jun 29, 2012A Hologram for the King, Dave Eggers' tale of adventure and economic hardship, debuts at No. 5.
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Jun 11, 2012 — Summer is a trying time for introverts, what with the barbecues and the graduations and the picnics by the pool. If you'd always choose a good book over a good party, critic Maureen Corrigan has a list for you.
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May 18, 2012 — Clarence Birdseye's life as a taxidermist, fur trader, hunter, and fish lobbyist all led to his creation of the modern frozen food industry. His inventions made frozen food tastier and more widely available to consumers.
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May 6, 2012 — Before locavores and the "slow food" movement, one man's invention radically transformed how (and what) we eat. In his new book, Mark Kurlansky shows us the curious, roving mind that made TV dinners possible.
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