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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Female friendship

Jul 18, 2014 — At No. 5, Christina Baker Kline's Orphan Train follows a foster child as she befriends an elderly woman and helps her solve a mystery from her past.
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Jan 31, 2014 — At No. 12, Christina Baker Kline's Orphan Train links together a teenager and an elderly woman.
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Dec 13, 2013 — Christina Baker Kline's Orphan Train, arriving at No. 15, follows two orphans from different eras.
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Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Nov 18, 2013 — Lessing's 1962 book was regarded as among the most important feminist novels of its time. She died Sunday. Fresh Air's Terry Gross interviewed Lessing in 1988 and 1992.
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Nov 17, 2013 — Author Doris Lessing died Sunday at the age of 94. Lessing won the 2007 Nobel Prize for literature for a life's work which included around 40 books and collections of essays and memoirs. Her book, The Golden Notebook, has been called the first feminist novel — a characterization Lessing rejected as "stupid."
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Nov 17, 2013 — Lessing's 1962 novel, The Golden Notebook, is considered one of the great works of the 20th Century. It's been called by many the first feminist novel, a distinction Lessing always rejected.
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Nov 4, 2013 — Bound by the confines of gender and finances, two young women take divergent paths in Elena Ferrante's The Story of a New Name, the second book in her "Neapolitan Novels" trilogy. Critic John Powers believes the bold, expansive series to be semi-autobiographical, a revelation from a secretive author who won't reveal her true name.
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Jul 25, 2013 — Author Jean Zimmerman chooses five books that "pick up where history leaves off," shedding new light on often forgotten corners of history, from the unruly Florida frontier of the 18th century to the real-life little dancer who inspired Edgar Degas' famous sculpture.
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Jun 24, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Rosecrans Baldwin opines about France, Carissa Phelps goes from juvy to J.D., and Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy chart the history of rabies. In fiction, Shani Boianjiu draws from her time as an Israeli soldier, and Sheila Heti crafts a novel from her own life experiences.
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