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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, more than 160 people have been arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Moscow (Russia)

Oct 19, 2011In England, where sniping at Booker Prize finalists is a national sport, this year's bickering was especially fierce. But last night's award of the prize to Julian Barnes' absorbing, elegant The Sense of an Ending provided ... just that.
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Jul 24, 2011 — Like a good summer read, a trip to the Rocky Mountains provides an elevated get-away from the daily grind. Nicole Magistro, owner of The Bookworm in Edwards, Colo., names some of the more popular reads for Vail Valley vacationers this summer.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Line by Olga Grushin. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Mar 30, 2011 — In the 1970s, writer Elena Gorokhova sat in her apartment in St. Petersburg — then Leningrad — writing books she knew wouldn't make it past the censors. She recommends three revolutionary reads affirming that the human voice endures, even under the most suffocating circumstances.
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Jan 20, 2011 — A writer's chance encounter with Vyacheslav Molotov's personal library leads to an encompassing, poetic and creative portrait of Russia's history and present.
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Mar 30, 2010 — A new comedy from Ian McEwan; the true-life adventures of the Victorian Brit who stole the secrets of tea from China; a Kenyan contemporary of Obama's father remembers the Mau Mau rebellion; and a new Russian master spins surprising fictional gold from the Godot-like tale of Soviet citizens waiting in an endless line.
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Jun 2, 2006 — Rona Brinlee of The Bookmark in Atlantic Beach, Fla., recommends The Dream Life of Sukhanov by Olga Grushin in her conversation about summer reading with Susan Stamberg on Morning Edition. "This novel is about the choices and compromises we make in order to get what we think we want," Brinlee says.
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Nov 3, 2005 — Barbara, a reader in Nashville, calls Bulgakov's novel "imaginative, grotesque, and beautiful."
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