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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Intergenerational relations

Jul 31, 2014 — Yelena Akhtiorskaya's debut is a funny, sometimes heartbreaking, uniquely American chronicle of a family of Soviet immigrants who have transplanted a bit of their home to Brooklyn's Brighton Beach.
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Jul 24, 2014 — Yelena Akhtiorskaya's debut novel is about a family that emigrates from Odessa to the Russian enclave of Brighton Beach in Brooklyn, N.Y. It's a funny tale full of insider knowledge and offbeat words.
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Dec 18, 2013 — What books that touch on topics of race would you recommend to a not-so-bookish teen? A reader asks us to share our suggestions.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Disappearing Moon Cafe by Sky Lee. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Feb 10, 2011 — From Adam Haslett's unchecked financial wizard to Cathleen Schine's late-life divorce to Alan Bradley's 11-year-old chemist and sleuth, this week's fiction is bursting with big personalities. And in nonfiction, journalist David Kirkpatrick profiles Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.
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Feb 11, 2010 — This year, Valentine's Day shares the 14th with Chinese New Year. Cupid had better flap his wings because it's the Year of the Tiger, and tigers don't eat chocolate. To commemorate this rare alignment, here are three books about love in Chinese families.
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Feb 2, 2010 — Things fall apart in Louise Erdrich's Shadow Tag. A woman's gift to science yields medical miracles — and outrage — in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. What will America be like with one-third more people? A strangely optimistic answer in The Next Hundred Million. And a teenager traces down a tragic family mystery in The Girl Who Fell from the Sky.
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Nov 22, 2005 — Farai Chideya talks with Roberta Satow about her book Doing the Right Thing: Taking Care of Your Elderly Parents, Even If They Didn't Take Care of You.
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Jun 22, 2005 — Nursing homes are often thought of as grim places. But a new approach is being tested. Instead of an institutional setting, the goal now is to provide a homelike — but safe — atmosphere for residents.
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May 11, 2005 — Ed Gordon speaks with author, minister and scholar Michael Eric Dyson about the effects of Bill Cosby's controversial remarks aimed at certain African-American communities. Dyson's new book is Is Bill Cosby Right: Or Has The Black Middle Class Lost Its Mind?
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