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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Israel's military has called up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza. Aid workers are warning of a growing humanitarian crisis in the region, including a significant displaced population and a potential shortage of drinking water.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Intergenerational relations

Jul 31, 2014 — Yelena Akhtiorskaya's debut is a funny, sometimes heartbreaking, uniquely American chronicle of a family of Soviet immigrants who have transplanted a bit of their home to Brooklyn's Brighton Beach.
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Jul 24, 2014 — Yelena Akhtiorskaya's debut novel is about a family that emigrates from Odessa to the Russian enclave of Brighton Beach in Brooklyn, N.Y. It's a funny tale full of insider knowledge and offbeat words.
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Dec 18, 2013 — What books that touch on topics of race would you recommend to a not-so-bookish teen? A reader asks us to share our suggestions.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Disappearing Moon Cafe by Sky Lee. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Feb 10, 2011 — From Adam Haslett's unchecked financial wizard to Cathleen Schine's late-life divorce to Alan Bradley's 11-year-old chemist and sleuth, this week's fiction is bursting with big personalities. And in nonfiction, journalist David Kirkpatrick profiles Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.
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Feb 11, 2010 — This year, Valentine's Day shares the 14th with Chinese New Year. Cupid had better flap his wings because it's the Year of the Tiger, and tigers don't eat chocolate. To commemorate this rare alignment, here are three books about love in Chinese families.
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Feb 2, 2010 — Things fall apart in Louise Erdrich's Shadow Tag. A woman's gift to science yields medical miracles — and outrage — in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. What will America be like with one-third more people? A strangely optimistic answer in The Next Hundred Million. And a teenager traces down a tragic family mystery in The Girl Who Fell from the Sky.
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Nov 22, 2005 — Farai Chideya talks with Roberta Satow about her book Doing the Right Thing: Taking Care of Your Elderly Parents, Even If They Didn't Take Care of You.
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Jun 22, 2005 — Nursing homes are often thought of as grim places. But a new approach is being tested. Instead of an institutional setting, the goal now is to provide a homelike — but safe — atmosphere for residents.
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May 11, 2005 — Ed Gordon speaks with author, minister and scholar Michael Eric Dyson about the effects of Bill Cosby's controversial remarks aimed at certain African-American communities. Dyson's new book is Is Bill Cosby Right: Or Has The Black Middle Class Lost Its Mind?
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