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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Burma

Aug 17, 2014 — Richard Flanagan's new novel follows a Tasmanian-born doctor, captured by the Japanese during WWII, who ends up caring for prisoners of war working on the notorious "Death Railway."
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Jul 25, 2014 — Debuting at No. 12, Vicki Constantine Croke's Elephant Company tells the story of an English soldier who used elephants to undermine Japanese occupation of Burma during World War II.
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Sep 26, 2012 — Condoleezza Rice remembers her time in the Bush administration, Michael Lewis and Thant Myint-U discuss the world's economies, Michael Moore recounts his journey toward becoming a filmmaker, and Toni Morrison collects essays about censorship and the power of literature.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Saving Fish From Drowning by Amy Tan. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Lizard Cage by Karen Connelly. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Feb 17, 2011 — It can be a frightening feeling, being out of place. Entering someone else's world and having to learn the ropes is a daunting task. Granta editor Ellah Allfrey recommends three books about encountering other cultures, from the extraterrestrial to the multicultural.
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Aug 3, 2010 — As a librarian and a reader, Nancy Pearl scours the shelves in search of hidden treasures — titles you may have missed. Her findings include two chilling thrillers, one exquisite 1960s memoir, a lively biography of George Orwell, an example of historical fiction at its very best, and much more fiction, nonfiction and poetry.
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Jun 6, 2008 — In his new book, Brendan I. Koerner recounts the almost unbelievable tale of Herman Perry. An African-American soldier serving in Burma, Perry became the subject of the greatest manhunt of World War II.
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May 28, 2007The Lizard Cage is a harrowing piece of fiction — with a lyrical streak — about inmates and jailers in a Burmese prison. Karen Connelly's novel first appeared in Canada and was named as a finalist for last year's Kiriyama Prize for fiction, which goes to outstanding works about the Pacific Rim and South Asia.
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Jan 16, 2007 — Historian Thant Myint-U is a former U.N. official and a native of Burma. His new book, The River of Lost Footsteps: Histories of Burma — part memoir, part history — explores the problems plaguing the country.
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