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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Rome

Dec 15, 2013 — Each Lenten season, Christians travel to Rome to visit a different martyr's shrine each day. The pilgrim-worn path, which dates back to the dawn of Christianity, includes some of the city's most striking churches and historic art. Theologian George Weigel, author of Roman Pilgrimage, says the journey grounded his faith in real places and people.
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Oct 27, 2013 — Rita Mae Brown, author of Rubyfruit Jungle and several mystery series, first read Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars in college. It's hardly a staid Latin history book — in fact, it's Brown's favorite guilty pleasure. An academic-looking cover hides a raunchy, violent, thrilling book, she says, full of "around-the-clock degradation."
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Jul 14, 2013 — When crime writer Karin Slaughter was struggling to find a good literary relationship, she turned to the Marcus Didius Falco series by Lindsey Davis. She learned about togas and scrolls and came away with a new template for a happy marriage.
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Aug 5, 2012 — In the new book, The Rise of Rome, author Anthony Everitt tracks Rome's ascension from a small market town to the greatest empire in the ancient world. Along the way, he traces the rise of some of the ancient world's most powerful players.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio by Amara Lakhous and Ann Goldstein. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Feb 2, 2011 — This week's fiction ranges from Robert Harris' take on Cicero's year as leader of Rome, to Louise Erdrich's twisted story of a marriage, to Walter Mosley's second Leonid McGill detective novel. In nonfiction, Elizabeth Gilbert gets Committed, and Michael Lewis probes The Big Short.
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Sep 28, 2010 — Antony and Cleopatra are among history's most famous lovers. The story of their affair, their war, their defeat and, finally, their suicides has been told and retold for centuries. Now, Adrian Goldsworthy, author of Antony and Cleopatra, uncovers the couple's true story.
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Jul 13, 2010 — Ancient Rome is often thought of as consistently victorious but its defeat at the hands of Carthage in 216 B.C. is one of the most studied and imitated battles of all time. Historian Robert L. O'Connell tells the story of Carthage's unexpected victory in The Ghosts of Cannae.
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Feb 9, 2010 — Three novels of past and present: Lynn Neary reviews the "perfect" novel for our down economy — written before the banks failed. Steve Inskeep reads a tale of political infighting resonant of today, but that follows events in Cicero's Rome. And Alan Cheuse celebrates The Lost Books of the Odyssey, a novel both timeless and very contemporary.
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Feb 2, 2010 — The legend of Spartacus has inspired so many fanciful retellings, it's easy to lose track of what actually happened back in 73 BC. In The Spartacus War, Barry Strauss gives a historical account of the charismatic rebel who inspired a slave revolt against Rome.
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