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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 17, 2014 | NPR · President Obama met Thursday with insurance company executives and a separate group of insurance regulators from the states, discussing their mutual interest in administering the new health care law.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · The president has visited Prince George's County, Md., four times this year. It is the most affluent county with an African-American majority. It also happens to be very close to the White House.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Kepler-186f is almost the same size as Earth, and it orbits in its star's "Goldilocks zone"-- where temperatures may be just right for life. But much is unknown because it's also 500 light-years away.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Rome

Dec 15, 2013 — Each Lenten season, Christians travel to Rome to visit a different martyr's shrine each day. The pilgrim-worn path, which dates back to the dawn of Christianity, includes some of the city's most striking churches and historic art. Theologian George Weigel, author of Roman Pilgrimage, says the journey grounded his faith in real places and people.
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Oct 27, 2013 — Rita Mae Brown, author of Rubyfruit Jungle and several mystery series, first read Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars in college. It's hardly a staid Latin history book — in fact, it's Brown's favorite guilty pleasure. An academic-looking cover hides a raunchy, violent, thrilling book, she says, full of "around-the-clock degradation."
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Jul 14, 2013 — When crime writer Karin Slaughter was struggling to find a good literary relationship, she turned to the Marcus Didius Falco series by Lindsey Davis. She learned about togas and scrolls and came away with a new template for a happy marriage.
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Aug 5, 2012 — In the new book, The Rise of Rome, author Anthony Everitt tracks Rome's ascension from a small market town to the greatest empire in the ancient world. Along the way, he traces the rise of some of the ancient world's most powerful players.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio by Amara Lakhous and Ann Goldstein. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Feb 2, 2011 — This week's fiction ranges from Robert Harris' take on Cicero's year as leader of Rome, to Louise Erdrich's twisted story of a marriage, to Walter Mosley's second Leonid McGill detective novel. In nonfiction, Elizabeth Gilbert gets Committed, and Michael Lewis probes The Big Short.
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Sep 28, 2010 — Antony and Cleopatra are among history's most famous lovers. The story of their affair, their war, their defeat and, finally, their suicides has been told and retold for centuries. Now, Adrian Goldsworthy, author of Antony and Cleopatra, uncovers the couple's true story.
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Jul 13, 2010 — Ancient Rome is often thought of as consistently victorious but its defeat at the hands of Carthage in 216 B.C. is one of the most studied and imitated battles of all time. Historian Robert L. O'Connell tells the story of Carthage's unexpected victory in The Ghosts of Cannae.
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Feb 9, 2010 — Three novels of past and present: Lynn Neary reviews the "perfect" novel for our down economy — written before the banks failed. Steve Inskeep reads a tale of political infighting resonant of today, but that follows events in Cicero's Rome. And Alan Cheuse celebrates The Lost Books of the Odyssey, a novel both timeless and very contemporary.
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Feb 2, 2010 — The legend of Spartacus has inspired so many fanciful retellings, it's easy to lose track of what actually happened back in 73 BC. In The Spartacus War, Barry Strauss gives a historical account of the charismatic rebel who inspired a slave revolt against Rome.
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