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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Poliomyelitis

Nov 25, 2013 — In The Man He Became, historian James Tobin says, despite misimpressions to the contrary, Americans of Franklin Roosevelt's day were well-aware of his disability — it was an important part of the personal narrative that helped him win the presidency.
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Oct 6, 2011 — Philip Roth explores a fictional New Jersey polio epidemic in 1944, while humorist David Sedaris offers animal fables, Isabel Wilkerson looks at black America's Great Migration, Bill Bryson examines the history of private life and Adriana Trigiani channels her grandmothers' wisdom.
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Jan 31, 2011 — The Bill and Melinda Gates foundation has released its annual letter, outlining goals for the coming year. What's on the list? Getting rid of polio, once and for all. Vaccines reduced the disease in the U.S. by 99 percent, but it still erupts in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria.
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Oct 14, 2010 — Roth, who has been writing novels for more than a half-century, explains how he comes up with his ideas — and why he continues to write every day. In his latest work, Nemesis, he imagines a fictional polio outbreak set in his hometown of Newark, N.J., during the 1940s.
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Oct 5, 2010 — In his new novel, Philip Roth sets a fictional yet plausible polio outbreak in his New Jersey hometown. Set in 1944, Nemesis describes the fear that plagued the country in the years before the vaccine was developed.
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Oct 4, 2010 — Two-dimensional characters and corny dialogue plague Roth's new novel about a 1944 polio epidemic in Newark, N.J. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author pulls off a gorgeous finale, but his latest work doesn't meet the high bar he set with American Pastoral.
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Jun 24, 2007 — Susan Richards Shreve's memoir of a mischievous childhood summer at FDR's Georgia polio sanitarium unspools in a voice that reads wry, wistful and sometimes offbeat, says 'Fresh Air' critic Maureen Corrigan.
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Jun 6, 2007 — Author Susan Richards Shreve talks about her memoir, Warm Springs: Traces of a Childhood at FDR's Polio Haven. Sent to Warm Springs as a child, Shreve recounts her stay at the Georgia resort redesigned by Franklin Delano Roosevelt for the care of polio patients.
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