Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Central American presidents met with President Obama, discussing the influx of unaccompanied children crossing the border. So far, Obama has not seen eye to eye with Congress on possible solutions.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss U.S. policy options in the Gaza Strip and Rep. Paul Ryan's anti-poverty plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Sayed Kashua is an Arab who writes novels in Hebrew and a sitcom in Arabic. A contradiction? Maybe. But his newest book is a good look at an often-overlooked segment of the Israeli population.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Political fiction

May 9, 2014 — John le Carre's counterterrorism thriller, A Delicate Truth, appears at No.10.
Comments |
Sep 19, 2013 — Martin Limon's hard-boiled tales of military police in Korea in the early 1970s are collected in the new Nightmare Range. Reviewer Nick Mancusi says Limon is " a sensitive observer of the darker angels of human nature" who only occasionally veers into cliche.
Comments |
Sep 1, 2013 — Author Ann Kirschner first read Anthony Trollope's Palliser series as a graduate student. Now, returning to it after more than 20 years, she finds her impression of the Victorian tale has transformed along with her life.
Comments |
Jun 17, 2013 — The capital of Northern Ireland is no longer the city of snipers that it was before the Good Friday Agreement, but novelist Stuart Neville still draws inspiration from the decades of violence. In The Ghosts of Belfast, he examines the shattered life of an IRA killer in the aftermath of The Troubles.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 16, 2013 — A dirty deed and official cover-up drive the plot in John le Carre's A Delicate Truth. The novel sets its sights on old-boy corruption and corporate criminality at the heart of the "Deep State," but critic Alan Cheuse finds this latest effort lacks the tension of le Carre's Cold War novels.
Comments |
Jan 8, 2013 — In fiction, Charlotte Rogan explores a shipwreck, while Thomas Mallon revisits Watergate. In nonfiction, Laurent Dubois considers Haiti afresh; Lawrence Krauss reinterprets the universe; and Alain de Botton finds value in religion for atheists.
Comments |
Aug 7, 2012 — More than 75,000 of you voted for your favorite young-adult fiction. Now, after all the nominating, sorting and counting, the final results are in. Here are the 100 best teen novels, chosen by the NPR audience.
Comments |
Jul 9, 2012 — NPR's Linda Wertheimer walks the halls of power — and the local cafes — with crime novelist Mike Lawson, whose Joe DeMarco books serve up murder and mayhem in the nation's capital.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 6, 2012 — In Christopher Buckley's latest political satire, They Eat Puppies, Don't They? a lobbyist teams up with a conservative policy wonk to spread a rumor that China is plotting to assassinate the Dalai Lama. Together, they create a huge disinformation campaign that nearly sparks World War III.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 25, 2012 — In his latest novel, Thomas Mallon takes a fresh look at the scandal that brought down the Nixon administration, re-imagining it through the eyes of the cast of characters involved.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Political fiction from NPR