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August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts recently met on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to try to work through issues that have been building up ever since Vladimir Putin returned to the Kremlin.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Master and servant

Jan 12, 2011 — Novelist Peter Carey returns with a funny riff on de Tocqueville's America, while David Remnick looks at the rise of President Obama, Rhodes scholar Wes Moore considers the prison life he might have lived, and Simon Johnson and James Kwak argue that America's megabanks should be cut down to size.
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Dec 6, 2010 — Making suggestions for your book club can be risky business. If everyone loves the book, you're a hero. If they hate it, it takes a while to live it down. NPR's Lynn Neary comes to the rescue with five book club recommendations that are sure to make for good conversation.
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Nov 17, 2010 — On Tuesday evening in New York City, the finalists for the National Book Award gathered on the eve of the ceremony to read from their work. NPR was there to capture the celebration.
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Jun 19, 2010 — Just what is a summer book, anyway? Does it have to be a big, fat, juicy page turner to earn the right to be packed away in the luggage (or downloaded on the e-reader)? We put that question to several book reviewers to find out what they like to take along on summer getaways.
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Jun 7, 2010 — 2010's best century-hopping novels will transport you from Europe of a millennium ago to '60s-era San Francisco, with stops in Spain and Berlin, and raucous encounters with Moors and Romantic poets, along the way. What more do you need except a sturdy sand chair?
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May 11, 2010 — Peter Carey's new novel Parrot and Olivier in America is a retelling of the life of historian Alexis de Tocqueville in which a French aristocrat and his reluctant working-class companion travel to a young United States to research American penitentiaries and escape political upheaval in France.
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May 10, 2010
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Feb 19, 2007 — In the 1950s, Uncle Tom's Cabin went from being a literary phenomenon to an object of scorn, with its title character symbolizing black self-loathing. Henry Louis Gates has re-examined the book in a new annotated edition.
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May 24, 2006 — A listener in Cincinnati recommends this novel about the bond between a woman in India and her housekeeper. Susan in Ohio writes: "This book leads the reader deeply into the cultures of India. It is both fascinating and moving to be allowed into [their lives.]"
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