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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama's carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Youth

May 25, 2014 — The award-winning author Anthony Doerr's newest novel approaches old history with two unfamiliar perspectives: a blind French girl and a German orphan. He says WWII history is as important as ever.
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May 19, 2014 — Anthony Doerr's All The Light We Cannot See follows a blind French girl and a young German private during World War II. It debuts at No. 2.
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May 10, 2014 — Anthony Doerr's new novel, All The Light We Cannot See, follows a blind French girl and a young German private after the Normandy invasion — but his gorgeous prose is marred by jagged jumps in time.
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Aug 18, 2011 — A growing number of colleges are assigning "common reads" — books that all incoming freshmen must read for their first week on campus. Wes Moore, author of the common read The Other Wes Moore, and student Sirena Wurth discuss what students gain from reading collectively.
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Jan 12, 2011 — Novelist Peter Carey returns with a funny riff on de Tocqueville's America, while David Remnick looks at the rise of President Obama, Rhodes scholar Wes Moore considers the prison life he might have lived, and Simon Johnson and James Kwak argue that America's megabanks should be cut down to size.
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Aug 18, 2010 — The days are getting shorter, and it's hard to breeze though pages like you did on vacation just a few short weeks ago. Critic Cord Jefferson offers five nonfiction titles — true stories that will gently ease you out of the summer months, and back into the routines of fall.
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Aug 16, 2010
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Apr 13, 2010 — Japan's reki-jo, or "history girls," love learning about shoguns' castles and samurai battles, and they idolize historical figures like rock stars. Some observers believe this is more than just a trend: The reki-jo subculture signals a kind of empowerment.
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Oct 2, 2008 — In this installment of the This American Moment series, Eboo Patel, director of the Interfaith Youth Core, discusses his efforts to promote religious pluralism among young people. Patel believes that this type of mutual respect and understanding is the "big idea of our time."
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Dec 27, 2007 — In the 1960s, Cathy Wilkerson was a member of the radical group Weatherman. She went underground for 10 years after an accidental explosion blew up a New York townhouse. The author of a new memoir is apologetic for her group's tactics, but not her politics.
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