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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Israel and Hamas carried out a rhetorical battle Sunday over the fate of dueling offers to extend a ceasefire. In the end, the fighting resumed after Saturday's 12-hour truce. Israel vowed to continue its military campaign, targeting tunnels along the border. Wary Gazans prepared as best they could for the feast that marks the end of Ramadan.
 
July 27, 2014 | NPR · Anne Barnard from The New York Times talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about the differences between the current explosion of violence in Gaza and previous ones.
 
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July 27, 2014 | NPR · The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn't dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Louisiana

Jan 29, 2014 — She was a struggling screenwriter before hitting it big with her books, including The Cutting Season. Locke talks with NPR's Michel Martin about the inspiration for her thrillers, and how she straddles the past and present of African-American life in her writing.
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Nov 15, 2013 — The 1853 memoir of free man turned captive Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave, appears at No. 10.
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Sep 16, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Stephen Tobolowski recalls his time as a character actor, Walter Stahr profiles Lincoln's adviser, David Byrne relates his ideas on music and Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson investigate failing states. In fiction, Attica Locke weaves a murder mystery in the Deep South.
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Aug 20, 2013 — Melissa Block talks with Lolis Eric Elie, a writer and editor behind the HBO series Treme about a new cookbook written in the voices of the show's characters. Elie says it reflects both old New Orleans traditions and more recent influences.
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May 17, 2013 — Sookie Stackhouse has one last adventure in Charlaine Harris' Dead Ever After. It debuts at No. 4.
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Sep 18, 2012 — Attica Locke was inspired to write her new novel after attending an interracial couple's wedding on a plantation. The Cutting Season tells the story of two murders set a century apart. The past, Locke says, "walks with us still."
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Aug 19, 2012 — Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the devastating losses and the inept government response, dominated the news cycle for a few months. But New Orleans residents' struggle to return home never stopped. Writer Daniel Wolff's new book follows several Crescent City characters as they rebuild after the disaster.
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Jun 2, 2012The Fish That Ate the Whale tells the story of Sam Zemurray, a Jewish immigrant who came to the U.S. as a teenager and became one of the biggest players in the banana business. "He's like the American dream in the shape of a single life," says author Rich Cohen.
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Nov 14, 2011 — Society has a fascination with crime — we can't seem to look away from the yellow police tape. Author Duane Swierczynski recommends three thrilling crime stories told in graphic-novel form.
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Aug 21, 2011 — The arc of American culture can be found in the nation's music. Author Tom Piazza shares that story in his new collection of essays, called Devil Sent the Rain: Music and Writing in Desperate America.
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