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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Internet

Aug 20, 2013 — There was a time when many thought the Internet was beyond government regulation, its very chaos a source of creativity and strength. Nate Anderson's The Internet Police looks at how law enforcement went about changing that.
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Jul 30, 2013 — Millions of people worldwide are leaving rural areas for urban ones. NPR Cities Project editor Franklyn Cater highlights five books that examine and celebrate 21st century life in the metropolis.
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May 28, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Deborah Harkness sends a witch and a vampire back to Elizabethan England, and John Lanchester looks at London circa 2008. In nonfiction, Sally Koslow explores parenting adult children, and Andrew Blum reveals the infrastructure behind the Internet.
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Mar 4, 2013 — Technology companies are constantly developing new apps and tools to make our lives easier. In an op-ed for The New York Times Evgeny Morozov, author of To Save Everything, Click Here, argues that Silicon Valley's quest for perfectionism is problematic.
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Jul 10, 2012 — Where do ideas come from and how can we have more of them? Science writer Jonah Lehrer recommends five books that explore the mysteries of the creative mind, and document the strange and beautiful world that our ideas have helped create.
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May 31, 2012 — What does the Internet look like? Journalist Andrew Blum decided to find out. His new book, Tubes, is a journey into the Internet's physical infrastructure — where our data is stored and transmitted.
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Feb 9, 2012 — The protests that led to the Egyptian revolution last year were organized in part by Wael Ghonim, who used an anonymous Facebook page to coordinate the demonstrations. In his new book, Ghonim explains how social media helped transform his country.
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Feb 8, 2012 — Egyptian activist Wael Ghonim offers a rousing firsthand account of the Egyptian popular uprising and the power of social media to catalyze political change.
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Jan 30, 2012 — In Consent of the Networked, Rebecca MacKinnon investigates how the governments and corporations that control the digital world can impinge on civil liberties.
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Jan 17, 2012 — The young Egyptian who became one of the faces of the Arab Spring says much more needs to be done to bring democracy to his country, but much has also already been achieved.
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