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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Newspaper publishing

Jul 27, 2011 — As a Rome-based newspaper falls apart, the men and women who produce it try to hold their own lives together. Author Tom Rachman draws on experience as a foreign correspondent in The Imperfectionists, which enjoys its 28th week on the list.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jan 5, 2011 — In fiction, the old world of ex-pat print journalists in Rome beckons. If you'd rather face the facts, there's unconventional parenting advice or Atul Gawande's prescriptions for modern surgeons. Plus memoirs by novelist Siri Hustvedt and rocker Ozzy Osbourne, and a biography of Warren Beatty.
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Dec 6, 2010 — Making suggestions for your book club can be risky business. If everyone loves the book, you're a hero. If they hate it, it takes a while to live it down. NPR's Lynn Neary comes to the rescue with five book club recommendations that are sure to make for good conversation.
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Jun 29, 2010 — Bestsellerdom doesn't necessarily bring with it a promise of quality, so we've hand-selected five titles from the NPR Bestseller List: an acutely observed first novel with satiric punch, three works of fiction from established authors at the top of their game, and a startlingly powerful science thriller from a nonfiction newcomer.
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Nov 10, 2009 — More staff picks of standout books. This week, new nonfiction: Newspaperman Harold Evans traces his rise, while poet Mary Karr details her fall — and redemption. Nina Totenberg reads the Scalia biography. And great detective writers reveal the origins of their famous sleuths.
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Nov 5, 2009 — The British journalist talks with Steve Inskeep about his tenure as editor of the Sunday Times in London and his crusade to maintain journalism's commitment to public good. Evans has a new memoir called My Paper Chase: True Stories of Vanished Times.
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Jan 10, 2006 — Book critic Alan Cheuse reviews Marjorie Kowalski Cole's debut novel, Correcting the Landscape. The story takes place in Fairbanks, Alaska, three years after the Exxon Valdez disaster and presents a public interest story intertwined with a love story.
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