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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Islamist extremist group Islamic State has released a new video that purports to show the beheading of an American journalist named Steven Sotloff. Two weeks ago, the group threatened to kill Sotloff in a video depicting the beheading of James Foley, another American journalist.
 
September 2, 2014 | NPR · In response to unrest in eastern Ukraine, NATO is considering forming a rapid reaction force — a topic that will be discussed at a summit this week in Wales. But how will Russia react, and is this the right move for the alliance? To learn more, Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Pifer, the director of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative at the Brookings Institution.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Pentagon has been transferring mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles to local police. Built to protect U.S. forces from roadside bomb blasts at war, these huge vehicles aren't always welcome.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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David Ritz

Jun 5, 2012 — The venerable guitarist is one of the most influential blues musicians in the world. In his memoir, When I Left Home, Guy describes what he calls his second birthday: the day he left his home of Louisiana for Chicago, blues capital of the world.
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Nov 17, 2010 — This week, why not down a shot or two of fiction that runs 25 words? If you're in the mood for something a little deeper, there are biographies of writer Louisa May Alcott and jazzman Thelonious Monk, and memoirs by comic artist R. Crumb and band leader Paul Shaffer.
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Sep 29, 2010 — In fiction, Dominick Dunne's posthumous novel skewers the Manhattan elite he covered for Vanity Fair, while Wicked author Gregory Maguire reimagines "The Little Match Girl." In nonfiction, Ron Paul argues we should End the Fed, while a historian shows how Homer's view of war still rings true.
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Oct 29, 2009 — Philosopher, civil rights activist and professor Cornel West has described himself as a "bluesman in the life of the mind, and a jazzman in the world of ideas." He talks with Neal Conan about his memoir, Living And Loving Out Loud.
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Oct 7, 2009 — Paul Shaffer is much more than just David Letterman's sidekick, his memoir reveals. We'll Be Here For the Rest of Our Lives details Shaffer's appearances on Saturday Night Live, his extended stint living in a hotel in Manhattan and the surprising place where he got his start in music.
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Jan 16, 2009 — Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five are synonymous with the birth of hip hop. But unknown to many, Flash was not part of the one song most associated with the group — "The Message." He tells Farai Chideya: "That particular record was part of the catalyst of me going into my drug addiction."
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Dec 1, 2008 — The 1950s insult comic Don Rickles made a name for himself by poking fun of audiences and public figures. His new book, Rickles' Letters, is a collection of imaginary correspondences to a variety of historical and contemporary figures.
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