Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Getty Images
August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
AP
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

AFP/Getty Images
August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

David Ritz

Jun 5, 2012 — The venerable guitarist is one of the most influential blues musicians in the world. In his memoir, When I Left Home, Guy describes what he calls his second birthday: the day he left his home of Louisiana for Chicago, blues capital of the world.
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 17, 2010 — This week, why not down a shot or two of fiction that runs 25 words? If you're in the mood for something a little deeper, there are biographies of writer Louisa May Alcott and jazzman Thelonious Monk, and memoirs by comic artist R. Crumb and band leader Paul Shaffer.
Comments |
Sep 29, 2010 — In fiction, Dominick Dunne's posthumous novel skewers the Manhattan elite he covered for Vanity Fair, while Wicked author Gregory Maguire reimagines "The Little Match Girl." In nonfiction, Ron Paul argues we should End the Fed, while a historian shows how Homer's view of war still rings true.
Comments |
Oct 29, 2009 — Philosopher, civil rights activist and professor Cornel West has described himself as a "bluesman in the life of the mind, and a jazzman in the world of ideas." He talks with Neal Conan about his memoir, Living And Loving Out Loud.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 7, 2009 — Paul Shaffer is much more than just David Letterman's sidekick, his memoir reveals. We'll Be Here For the Rest of Our Lives details Shaffer's appearances on Saturday Night Live, his extended stint living in a hotel in Manhattan and the surprising place where he got his start in music.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jan 16, 2009 — Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five are synonymous with the birth of hip hop. But unknown to many, Flash was not part of the one song most associated with the group — "The Message." He tells Farai Chideya: "That particular record was part of the catalyst of me going into my drug addiction."
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 1, 2008 — The 1950s insult comic Don Rickles made a name for himself by poking fun of audiences and public figures. His new book, Rickles' Letters, is a collection of imaginary correspondences to a variety of historical and contemporary figures.
Launch in player | Comments |
more David Ritz from NPR