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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Scandals

Sep 7, 2011 — The heroine of Denise Hamilton's latest novel is a crisis management expert charged with cooling down the media maelstrom after an old friend is involved in a high-profile crime.
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Oct 20, 2010 — This week, Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol finally arrives in paperback, while Jennie Sanford explores her South Carolina governor husband's fall from grace and Steven Landsburg draws on math, physics and economics to challenge our ideas about what we believe.
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Aug 26, 2010 — In her new book about bad behavior, Laura Kipnis explores why we can't look away when a public drama unfolds. But critic Susan Jane Gilman says her approach is a bit too timid for such a titillating topic.
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Feb 8, 2010 — Of the recent political scandals involving infidelity — John Edwards, Elliott Spitzer, James McGreevy — one stands out, not for what the politician did, but for what his wife did not do. Jenny Sanford, wife of Gov. Mark Sanford, did not stand by her man in the cameras' glare. Her new memoir explains why.
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Mar 26, 2009 — When a mock kidnapping of his mistress goes awry, a rising Tory politician covers his involvement. So begins The Birthday Present, Barbara Vine's latest psychological thriller.
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Jun 18, 2007Fresh Air's book critic suggests the aptly titled 'Summer Reading,' by Hilma Wolitzer; 'Be Near Me,' by Andrew O'Hagan, and the much-lauded 'On Chesil Beach,' by Ian McEwan.
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Nov 25, 2006 — NPR's Scott Simon talks to former Clinton advisor Lanny Davis about his new book, Scandal: How 'Gotcha' Politics is Destroying America. Davis says the midterm elections represented a revolt against the divisive, take-no-prisoners political approach of both Republicans and Democrats.
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Aug 29, 2006 — A forthcoming book by journalists Michael Isikoff and David Corn suggests that Richard Armitage, Deputy Secretary of State in 2003, may be the missing link in the story that has been called "Plamegate."
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Oct 22, 2004 — Presidential campaigns mean a busy time for politicos and journalists — and also for satirists. The Washington, D.C.-based comedy troupe the Capitol Steps has been in the thick of it, writing songs and skits that bring out the silly side of the campaign trail.
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