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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Scandals

Sep 7, 2011 — The heroine of Denise Hamilton's latest novel is a crisis management expert charged with cooling down the media maelstrom after an old friend is involved in a high-profile crime.
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Oct 20, 2010 — This week, Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol finally arrives in paperback, while Jennie Sanford explores her South Carolina governor husband's fall from grace and Steven Landsburg draws on math, physics and economics to challenge our ideas about what we believe.
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Aug 26, 2010 — In her new book about bad behavior, Laura Kipnis explores why we can't look away when a public drama unfolds. But critic Susan Jane Gilman says her approach is a bit too timid for such a titillating topic.
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Feb 8, 2010 — Of the recent political scandals involving infidelity — John Edwards, Elliott Spitzer, James McGreevy — one stands out, not for what the politician did, but for what his wife did not do. Jenny Sanford, wife of Gov. Mark Sanford, did not stand by her man in the cameras' glare. Her new memoir explains why.
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Mar 26, 2009 — When a mock kidnapping of his mistress goes awry, a rising Tory politician covers his involvement. So begins The Birthday Present, Barbara Vine's latest psychological thriller.
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Jun 18, 2007Fresh Air's book critic suggests the aptly titled 'Summer Reading,' by Hilma Wolitzer; 'Be Near Me,' by Andrew O'Hagan, and the much-lauded 'On Chesil Beach,' by Ian McEwan.
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Nov 25, 2006 — NPR's Scott Simon talks to former Clinton advisor Lanny Davis about his new book, Scandal: How 'Gotcha' Politics is Destroying America. Davis says the midterm elections represented a revolt against the divisive, take-no-prisoners political approach of both Republicans and Democrats.
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Aug 29, 2006 — A forthcoming book by journalists Michael Isikoff and David Corn suggests that Richard Armitage, Deputy Secretary of State in 2003, may be the missing link in the story that has been called "Plamegate."
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Oct 22, 2004 — Presidential campaigns mean a busy time for politicos and journalists — and also for satirists. The Washington, D.C.-based comedy troupe the Capitol Steps has been in the thick of it, writing songs and skits that bring out the silly side of the campaign trail.
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