Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its DNA. But it's still unclear what these mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
Getty Images
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
Getty Images
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Social values

Jan 8, 2014 — In softcover nonfiction, William Knoedelseder looks at the family behind Budweiser, Charles Duhigg delves into the science of habit, Fred Kaplan explores an Army revolution, and Whole Foods' founder argues for businesses pursuing a higher purpose. In fiction, George Saunders delivers a collection of fantastical stories.
Comments |
Jan 16, 2013 — The outspoken Whole Foods founder tells us why he hates "Obamacare" and why we have trouble cutting the sugar, fat and salt out of our diets. But now he's told CBS he used a poor choice of words when referring to the health law as fascism.
Launch in player | Comments |
Mar 27, 2008 — Last week, Talk of the Nation embarked on a political adventure and asked you to serve as our guides. We wanted to hear your stories of the first time you became political: What happened, and how does that experience influence your politics? Today, we'll hear your replies.
Launch in player | Comments |
Mar 4, 2008 — In her new critique of contemporary culture, Susan Jacoby lambastes America's increasing preoccupation with "anti-intellectualism" and "junk thought." The Age of American Unreason is her eighth book.
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 24, 2006 — Many young people in Japan have become hermits — retreating into worlds that consist of little more than their rooms. And that's difficult for families. Michele Norris talks with Michael Zielenziger, author of Shutting Out the Sun: How Japan Created Its Own Lost Generation.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 31, 2006 — Commentator Rod Dreher lives in Dallas. He's been driving back and forth to work in a car without air conditioning all summer long. And while it hasn't been comfortable or easy, it's made him appreciate the AC in his home and office. Dreher, a writer at the Dallas Morning News, is the author of Crunchy Cons. He blogs at Beliefnet.com.
Launch in player | Comments |
Mar 10, 2006 — Commentator Rod Dreher says conservatives could find inspiration from fellow Republicans who embrace a counter-cultural yet traditional conservative lifestyle — what he dubs "Crunchy Cons."
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 4, 2005 — Blurring the line between church and state threatens civil liberties and privacy, says former president Jimmy Carter. That's the case he makes in his new book, Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 11, 2005 — Ed Gordon speaks with author, minister and scholar Michael Eric Dyson about the effects of Bill Cosby's controversial remarks aimed at certain African-American communities. Dyson's new book is Is Bill Cosby Right: Or Has The Black Middle Class Lost Its Mind?
Launch in player | Comments |
May 3, 2005 — A year ago, Bill Cosby set off a national debate in a speech to the NAACP where he criticized poor blacks in sometimes harsh language. Cosby emphasized personal responsibility, or the lack of it. In a new book, Michael Eric Dyson describes Cosby's remarks as a vicious attack on the most vulnerable among us.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Social values from NPR