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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Activists say a federal law that allows employers to pay people with disabilities pennies per hour is out of date and should be changed. But some say the law is a lifeline for the disabled.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. They'll perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
 

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April 22, 2014 | NPR · Washington Gov. Jay Inslee offers an update on the deadly mudslides near the town of Oso in March. President Obama is visiting Oso on Tuesday.
 
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April 22, 2014 | NPR · The Army plans to take all Apache attack helicopters from the National Guard. The Guard says that's an insult, but Army leaders say it's not personal — it's just about saving money.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · The White House named Neil Eggleston its new top lawyer. He'll have to muster his legal and political skills to deal with a divided Congress and multiple investigations of the Obama's administration.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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American wit and humor, Pictorial

Jun 18, 2013 — When's the last time you read a comic book? Here are five for summer, covering everything from tiny Finnish critters to Viennese punk rockers and musings on Anna Wintour. Writer Myla Goldberg says they represent a golden age in comic art.
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Oct 18, 2011New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast says she is sure of two things: that she's an anxious person, and that she knows her alphabet by heart. In her new book, What I Hate: From A to Z, Chast puts her dislikes and fears in alphabetical order, with a full-page cartoon for each of her 26 anxieties.
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Aug 10, 2011 — Fairy tales — those stories of princes and princesses, spells and magic — have sparked kids' imaginations for centuries. But author John Baxter suggests a very different kind of fiction to get young synapses firing: He recommends three tales filled with creepy characters you're sure to love.
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Dec 1, 2010 — Even in a year notable for economic bust and an e-reader boom, big art books, lush photo retrospectives and other gems both quirky and collectible continue to roam the earth. Here are gift-book suggestions for every taste and budget.
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Sep 28, 2010 — In the spring of 1970, a daring new product hit American newsstands. It was called National Lampoon, and it made its name with sex- and drug-laden satire of everyday American life. Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead is Lampoon contributor Rick Meyerowitz's account of the magazine's best years.
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Jul 11, 2008 — The gritty, essential cartoons that Bill Mauldin published during World War II are the real thing and then some. Laurel Maury reviews a new collection of the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist's work.
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Jan 25, 2008 — Is it possible to laugh about global climate change? New Yorker cartoonist Sidney Harris thinks so. Harris and his New Yorker colleagues have collaborated on a collection of cartoons that find the humor lurking behind impending environmental doom.
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Jan 25, 2008 — The New Yorker magazine kicked some more cartoon submissions to the curb this week. Cartoonist Matthew Diffee stops by with a couple, one about Martha Stewart and one about an unusual Eskimo.
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Nov 15, 2007 — Matthew Diffee contributes regularly to the cartoonists' bible, The New Yorker. But that magazine gets more than 500 submissions a week — and publishes only 20 cartoons in each issue. Diffee's new book, featuring his work and that of other New Yorker regulars, is The Rejection Collection, Vol. 2: The Cream of the Crap.
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May 29, 2007 — A new collection of censored cartoons reveals what doesn't make it onto the editorial page. David Wallis assembled the collection Killed Cartoons: Casualties from the War on Free Expression. He discusses what happens to cartoons that are deemed too controversial for print.
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