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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Historiography

Nov 25, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Joyce Carol Oates wreaks karmic horror on turn-of-the-century Princeton, and Sebastian Faulks braids five lives in the search for what makes a self. In softcover nonfiction, Elton John tells the story of his crusade for better AIDS treatment, and Bernard Lewis maps the Middle East with a life's worth of anecdotes.
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Aug 1, 2012 — In Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World, historian John Dower examines how culture and propaganda have shaped politics in the U.S. and Japan. He also explores the idea that how and what we remember can affect how we view history and the present.
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May 15, 2012 — Over his long academic career, Bernard Lewis has arguably become the world's greatest historian of the Middle East. Now, at 96, Lewis turns his attention inward in Notes on a Century, a memoir that looks back on his life, work and legacy.
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Nov 6, 2008 — From The Federalist Papers to The Feminine Mystique, Jay Parini's Promised Land examines 13 books that shaped and changed America. Maureen Corrigan has a review.
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Nov 21, 2006 — Historian Kyle Ward speaks with Steve Inskeep about his book, History in the Making. It chronicles the ways that U.S. history textbooks change over time in their portrayal of events like the Mexican-American War. This is the first in a series of conversations about history.
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Jan 16, 2006 — Ed Gordon talks with historian Manning Marable about his new book Living Black History, a look at black history's continuing importance to modern-day activism. Marable is a professor of history, political science and public policy at Columbia University.
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Sep 15, 2005 — In his latest book, historian Garry Wills takes a new approach to a history of America written by a member of the famous Adams family. In Henry Adams and the Making of America, Wills refutes the accepted reading of Adams' history as an attack on Thomas Jefferson and provides interesting insights into our national history that resonate in politics today. Wills is professor of history emeritus at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.
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May 30, 2005 — Memorial Day emerged from the U.S. Civil War as a day of remembrance for service men and women who have died for this country. Since then, the significance of the day has fluctuated with public opinion. Matthew Dennis, history professor at the University of Oregon and author of Red, White and Blue Letter Days: Identity, History and the American Calendar, offers some historical perspective.
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