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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Historiography

Nov 25, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Joyce Carol Oates wreaks karmic horror on turn-of-the-century Princeton, and Sebastian Faulks braids five lives in the search for what makes a self. In softcover nonfiction, Elton John tells the story of his crusade for better AIDS treatment, and Bernard Lewis maps the Middle East with a life's worth of anecdotes.
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Aug 1, 2012 — In Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World, historian John Dower examines how culture and propaganda have shaped politics in the U.S. and Japan. He also explores the idea that how and what we remember can affect how we view history and the present.
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May 15, 2012 — Over his long academic career, Bernard Lewis has arguably become the world's greatest historian of the Middle East. Now, at 96, Lewis turns his attention inward in Notes on a Century, a memoir that looks back on his life, work and legacy.
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Nov 6, 2008 — From The Federalist Papers to The Feminine Mystique, Jay Parini's Promised Land examines 13 books that shaped and changed America. Maureen Corrigan has a review.
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Nov 21, 2006 — Historian Kyle Ward speaks with Steve Inskeep about his book, History in the Making. It chronicles the ways that U.S. history textbooks change over time in their portrayal of events like the Mexican-American War. This is the first in a series of conversations about history.
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Jan 16, 2006 — Ed Gordon talks with historian Manning Marable about his new book Living Black History, a look at black history's continuing importance to modern-day activism. Marable is a professor of history, political science and public policy at Columbia University.
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Sep 15, 2005 — In his latest book, historian Garry Wills takes a new approach to a history of America written by a member of the famous Adams family. In Henry Adams and the Making of America, Wills refutes the accepted reading of Adams' history as an attack on Thomas Jefferson and provides interesting insights into our national history that resonate in politics today. Wills is professor of history emeritus at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.
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May 30, 2005 — Memorial Day emerged from the U.S. Civil War as a day of remembrance for service men and women who have died for this country. Since then, the significance of the day has fluctuated with public opinion. Matthew Dennis, history professor at the University of Oregon and author of Red, White and Blue Letter Days: Identity, History and the American Calendar, offers some historical perspective.
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