Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse
July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Historiography

Nov 25, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Joyce Carol Oates wreaks karmic horror on turn-of-the-century Princeton, and Sebastian Faulks braids five lives in the search for what makes a self. In softcover nonfiction, Elton John tells the story of his crusade for better AIDS treatment, and Bernard Lewis maps the Middle East with a life's worth of anecdotes.
Comments |
Aug 1, 2012 — In Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World, historian John Dower examines how culture and propaganda have shaped politics in the U.S. and Japan. He also explores the idea that how and what we remember can affect how we view history and the present.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 15, 2012 — Over his long academic career, Bernard Lewis has arguably become the world's greatest historian of the Middle East. Now, at 96, Lewis turns his attention inward in Notes on a Century, a memoir that looks back on his life, work and legacy.
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 6, 2008 — From The Federalist Papers to The Feminine Mystique, Jay Parini's Promised Land examines 13 books that shaped and changed America. Maureen Corrigan has a review.
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 21, 2006 — Historian Kyle Ward speaks with Steve Inskeep about his book, History in the Making. It chronicles the ways that U.S. history textbooks change over time in their portrayal of events like the Mexican-American War. This is the first in a series of conversations about history.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jan 16, 2006 — Ed Gordon talks with historian Manning Marable about his new book Living Black History, a look at black history's continuing importance to modern-day activism. Marable is a professor of history, political science and public policy at Columbia University.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 15, 2005 — In his latest book, historian Garry Wills takes a new approach to a history of America written by a member of the famous Adams family. In Henry Adams and the Making of America, Wills refutes the accepted reading of Adams' history as an attack on Thomas Jefferson and provides interesting insights into our national history that resonate in politics today. Wills is professor of history emeritus at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 30, 2005 — Memorial Day emerged from the U.S. Civil War as a day of remembrance for service men and women who have died for this country. Since then, the significance of the day has fluctuated with public opinion. Matthew Dennis, history professor at the University of Oregon and author of Red, White and Blue Letter Days: Identity, History and the American Calendar, offers some historical perspective.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Historiography from NPR