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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Syria will likely meet an upcoming deadline to hand over its declared chemical weapons. But the agreement seems to have emboldened the Syrian regime to use other brutal tactics, including a chemical not covered by the deal.
 
April 24, 2014 | NPR · As diplomatic talks in Geneva have failed to resolve the three-year-old civil war in Syria, the U.S. is undertaking a new covert program to send weapons in support of rebel forces there.
 
April 24, 2014 | NPR · The Israeli government suspended peace talks with Palestinians, citing a unity agreement announced Wednesday by Palestinian leadership. The Israeli security cabinet came to the decision unanimously, angered by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's decision to end a seven-year schism with the Hamas movement.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Muslims

Oct 12, 2013 — Author Denise Spellberg's book draws parallels between the beliefs of the founding father and religious tolerance in the United States today.
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Aug 16, 2012 — In fiction, novelists Sebastian Rotella and Tahmima Anam explore cultural frictions along South America's "triple border" and in Bangladesh, respectively. In nonfiction, Jermaine Jackson remembers his brother Michael, and Charles King explores the history of Odessa, Ukraine.
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May 9, 2012 — Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf was once the lead cleric associated with the proposed Islamic community center some critics called the "ground zero mosque." In his new book, Moving the Mountain, Rauf calls for moderate Muslims to step up and marginalize the voices of extremists.
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Jul 31, 2011 — Against the backdrop of the aftermath of the war for Bangladeshi independence, the central characters in Tahmima Anam's novel — a brother and sister — take very divergent religious pathways. The author discusses the idea of a family rebuilding as their nation does the same.
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Jul 29, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Good Muslim: A Novel by Tahmima Anam. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Oct 29, 2009 — Ali Eteraz returned to his home country of Pakistan after living in the US to find himself at the center of an abduction plot. He describes his experiences in his new memoir, Children of the Dust.
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Oct 2, 2008 — In this installment of the This American Moment series, Eboo Patel, director of the Interfaith Youth Core, discusses his efforts to promote religious pluralism among young people. Patel believes that this type of mutual respect and understanding is the "big idea of our time."
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Nov 16, 2007 — In this week's Faith Matters, Imam Hassan Qazwini discusses his book American Crescent in the wake of the Los Angeles Police Department's recent plan to create a database of the city's Muslim Americans. The city later aborted the plan following public outcry.
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Sep 10, 2007 — Five years ago, Mukhtar al-Bakri was arrested in Bahrain on his wedding night. Days later, his friends were arrested in Lackawanna, N.Y. How did six Muslim-American teenagers end up in an al-Qaida training camp? Dina Temple-Raston discusses her book, The Jihad Next Door.
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Sep 10, 2007 — Five years after the arrest of six young men from Lackawanna, N.Y., questions remain about whether the so-called "homegrown terrorists" are as dangerous as authorities initially suggested. A book by NPR's Dina Temple-Raston explores the subject.
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