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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Race awareness

Aug 15, 2014 — Jess Row's provocative Your Face in Mine uses the rhetoric of transgender experience to imagine a world where race can be changed; reviewer Amal El-Mohtar calls it a grating meditation on white guilt.
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Apr 16, 2014 — The announcement of the winners and finalists for the Pulitzer Prizes gives us an opportunity to herald great journalism that illuminates matters relating to race, ethnicity and culture.
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Aug 23, 2011 — While many hoped Barack Obama's presidency would usher in a post-racial period in America, Randall Kennedy says the reality hasn't lived up to that expectation. In The Persistence of the Color Line, Kennedy explores the racial issues still at play in the presidency and throughout the country.
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Nov 23, 2010 — In fiction, Herta Mueller, winner of 2009's literature Nobel, writes poetically about life under totalitarianism, and Elizabeth Berg crafts an entertaining account of a 40th high school reunion. In nonfiction — John Adams' letters, America's tacky Christmas traditions, and the sequel to Stuff White People Like.
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Sep 16, 2008 — In his new book, How Does It Feel To Be A Problem? Moustafa Bayoumi profiles seven young Brooklyn residents of Arab and Muslim heritage, detailing the obstacles they've faced since Sept. 11.
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Sep 11, 2008 — The aftermath of Sept. 11 was a particularly difficult time for Arab and Muslim-American children in the U.S. Author Moustafa Bayoumi talks about some of the challenges chronicled in his new book How Does it Feel to Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America.
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Sep 2, 2008 — In a new book based on his popular blog, Christian Lander tracks the trends and tendencies of white people, from fair-trade organic coffee to vintage T-shirts.
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Dec 30, 2005 — Tony Cox examines mixed-race relationships in America with guests Debra Dickerson, author of the book The End of Blackness and Carmen Van Kerckhove, co-director of New Demographic, a diversity training company.
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Jun 7, 2005 — Topics on Tuesday's roundtable include kidnappings in Haiti, soldiers returning from Iraq who have trouble finding work and criticism of the scheduled Live 8 concerts benefiting Africa as being "too white." Guests: Debra Dickerson, author of The End of Blackness and An American Story; Roland Martin, executive editor of The Chicago Defender; and Nat Irvin, professor at Wake Forest University.
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