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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Race awareness

Apr 16, 2014 — The announcement of the winners and finalists for the Pulitzer Prizes gives us an opportunity to herald great journalism that illuminates matters relating to race, ethnicity and culture.
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Aug 23, 2011 — While many hoped Barack Obama's presidency would usher in a post-racial period in America, Randall Kennedy says the reality hasn't lived up to that expectation. In The Persistence of the Color Line, Kennedy explores the racial issues still at play in the presidency and throughout the country.
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Nov 23, 2010 — In fiction, Herta Mueller, winner of 2009's literature Nobel, writes poetically about life under totalitarianism, and Elizabeth Berg crafts an entertaining account of a 40th high school reunion. In nonfiction — John Adams' letters, America's tacky Christmas traditions, and the sequel to Stuff White People Like.
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Sep 16, 2008 — In his new book, How Does It Feel To Be A Problem? Moustafa Bayoumi profiles seven young Brooklyn residents of Arab and Muslim heritage, detailing the obstacles they've faced since Sept. 11.
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Sep 11, 2008 — The aftermath of Sept. 11 was a particularly difficult time for Arab and Muslim-American children in the U.S. Author Moustafa Bayoumi talks about some of the challenges chronicled in his new book How Does it Feel to Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America.
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Sep 2, 2008 — In a new book based on his popular blog, Christian Lander tracks the trends and tendencies of white people, from fair-trade organic coffee to vintage T-shirts.
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Dec 30, 2005 — Tony Cox examines mixed-race relationships in America with guests Debra Dickerson, author of the book The End of Blackness and Carmen Van Kerckhove, co-director of New Demographic, a diversity training company.
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Jun 7, 2005 — Topics on Tuesday's roundtable include kidnappings in Haiti, soldiers returning from Iraq who have trouble finding work and criticism of the scheduled Live 8 concerts benefiting Africa as being "too white." Guests: Debra Dickerson, author of The End of Blackness and An American Story; Roland Martin, executive editor of The Chicago Defender; and Nat Irvin, professor at Wake Forest University.
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