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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the last 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Iranian Americans

Nov 4, 2013 — Journalist Hooman Majd's new book, The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay, was inspired by the year he and his young American family spent in Tehran, where Majd was born. He tells Fresh Air about the country's long-standing tradition of sulking, and what sets Tehran apart from most other Islamic metropolises.
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Apr 28, 2009 — In America, we take freedom of speech for granted. From bumper stickers to Jon Stewart, we often fail to acknowledge just how much our First Amendment rights afford us. But as an Iranian-American, commentator Firoozeh Dumas appreciates all of it — even Rush Limbaugh.
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Feb 24, 2009 — When Steve Inskeep visited Iran in this month, these three books provided the guidance he needed to understand the country's complicated approach to free speech and expression.
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Feb 10, 2009 — Memoir writers Azar Nafisi and Azadeh Moaveni chronicle life in pre- and post-revolution Iran — and offer a glimpse of a people struggling to find pockets of freedom within a repressive regime.
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Dec 21, 2008 — Forget the picturesque tree and perfectly arranged presents. Christmas means blending old customs with new traditions, even if the result is messier than a bag full of carrot jam.
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Nov 11, 2008 — In The Ayatollah Begs to Differ, Hooman Majd, an Iranian-American writer and the grandson of an ayatollah, travels behind "Persian walls" to provide a revealing look at modern Iran.
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Sep 25, 2008 — When President Ahmadinejad of Iran spoke at the UN this week, his translator was Hooman Majd. But Majd isn't a professional translator. He's a writer, and his new book is called The Ayatollah Begs to Differ: The Paradox of Modern Iran.
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Jun 21, 2008 — Writer Firoozeh Dumas talks about her new memoir, Laughing Without an Accent. It's a collection of humorous essays about her life as the daughter of Iranian immigrants.
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Jan 9, 2007 — A memoir tells of a journey between two countries and cultures. My Name Is Iran follows three generations of Iranian-American women and the personal, political and religious decisions that each must make.
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May 3, 2006 — Renee Montagne talks with Time Magazine's Azadeh Moaveni about how the nuclear debate is playing in Iran. Moaveni says the debate sounds different when you're in Tehran. Nuclear power is an issue of national pride, and the domestic press doesn't talk about the consequences Iran faces by pursuing nukes.
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