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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Joseph J. Ellis

Sep 14, 2011 — In fiction, Brad Meltzer imagines a presidential spy ring, and the latest installment in the popular Naruto manga series arrives. In nonfiction, Stacy Schiff reconstructs Cleopatra, Justice Stephen Breyer contemplates democracy, and Joseph Ellis finds an abiding love story in the letters of John and Abigail Adams.
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Nov 23, 2010 — In fiction, Herta Mueller, winner of 2009's literature Nobel, writes poetically about life under totalitarianism, and Elizabeth Berg crafts an entertaining account of a 40th high school reunion. In nonfiction — John Adams' letters, America's tacky Christmas traditions, and the sequel to Stuff White People Like.
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Oct 27, 2010 — Historian and author Joseph Ellis' First Family draws from decades of correspondence between John Adams and his wife, Abigail, to reveal the achievements of America's second president, and the sacrifice and influence of his first lady.
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Nov 5, 2007 — In his new book, American Creation, historian Joseph Ellis gets to the bottom of some of the tall tales about America's founding fathers. Ellis says that the founding of the country was an era of flawed greatness.
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Oct 26, 2006 — Our first president was never the life of the party. Couldn't stand small talk. And some say he didn't even like to be touched. Yet in 1798 alone, more than 650 guests dined at his home. So what gives? Was Washington a closet bon vivant?
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Jul 13, 2005 — According ot our reviewer, Alan Greenblatt, this book avoids "historical hindsight." Even when Ellis sums up an important battle in a paragraph, he doesn't stint in explaining its importance to the tides of war.
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Nov 2, 2004 — A discussion of the most important American president of them all — our first. Historian Joseph Ellis talks about his 2004 biography, His Excellency: George Washington. He was, as his colleague Henry Lee said upon his death, "First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen." Is he still in our hearts?
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Oct 25, 2004 — In His Excellency: George Washington, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph J. Ellis examines the myths and realities surrounding our nation's first president. Ellis suggests Washington was motivated as much by enlightened self-interest as idealism. Ellis speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep.
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