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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Jazz

Dec 28, 2011 — The NPR Music staff presents 12 titles that range from the art of album covers to disco to Def Jam to metal to MTV. This year, our favorite music reads were mostly revealing biographies and wide-spanning analyses.
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Dec 20, 2011 — Before the Civil Rights movement, segregated American cities helped give birth to the Chitlin' Circuit, a touring revue that provided employment for hundreds of black musicians. Rock historian Ed Ward profiles two recent books which illuminate the conditions these musicians endured.
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Jul 19, 2011 — She cried the first time she heard Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight," and proceeded to dedicate her life (and massive inheritance) to jazz. A new biography delves into the life of Kathleen Annie Pannonica de Koenigswarter, aka "The Jazz Baroness."
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Dec 5, 2009 — In 1957, photographer W. Eugene Smith moved into a lower Manhattan loft which served as a late-night hangout for jazz musicians. He proceeded to make approximately 4,000 hours of reel-to-reel tape recordings, and take nearly 40,000 photos, in and around his apartment.
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Jul 29, 2008 — Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM and the American Experimental Music by George E. Lewis. The book tracks the history of Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, an organization that promoted the development of new jazz styles.
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Nov 28, 2006 — What kid wouldn't like a comforting, joyful book for a holiday gift? A lot of 'em. For true holiday joy, make sure the books you give are truly enjoyable. Here are suggestions for different ages, stages and interests.
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Aug 30, 2006 — Photographer William Claxton began making a name for himself in the 1950s, taking photos of some of the world's top jazz artists. Then got the opportunity of a lifetime — he was commissioned to document the American jazz scene at a moment when the genre was at its height.
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Jun 6, 2006 — Impulse Records was launched during a golden age of jazz and it featured a variety of legendary artists — from John Coltrane to Ray Charles. Its edgy sound reflected the turbulent politics of the 1960s, the author of a new book about the label says.
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Apr 28, 2006 — William Gottlieb died of a stroke last Sunday at the age of 89. In the '40s, Gottlieb learned photography and took hundreds of shots of the jazz greats of the time. Many of those shots are now well known through album covers, books, and posters. 200 of those photos appear in Gottlieb's book, The Golden Age of Jazz.
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Jan 19, 2006 — The wet spell in the Pacific Northwest is seen as an opportunity for Nancy Pearl, the Seattle librarian who regularly shares her recommended readings. She shares her list of books for a rainy day.
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