Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
Getty Images
April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
AP
April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
Barcroft Media/Landov
April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

AP
April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Jazz

Dec 28, 2011 — The NPR Music staff presents 12 titles that range from the art of album covers to disco to Def Jam to metal to MTV. This year, our favorite music reads were mostly revealing biographies and wide-spanning analyses.
Comments |
Dec 20, 2011 — Before the Civil Rights movement, segregated American cities helped give birth to the Chitlin' Circuit, a touring revue that provided employment for hundreds of black musicians. Rock historian Ed Ward profiles two recent books which illuminate the conditions these musicians endured.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 19, 2011 — She cried the first time she heard Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight," and proceeded to dedicate her life (and massive inheritance) to jazz. A new biography delves into the life of Kathleen Annie Pannonica de Koenigswarter, aka "The Jazz Baroness."
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 5, 2009 — In 1957, photographer W. Eugene Smith moved into a lower Manhattan loft which served as a late-night hangout for jazz musicians. He proceeded to make approximately 4,000 hours of reel-to-reel tape recordings, and take nearly 40,000 photos, in and around his apartment.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2008 — Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM and the American Experimental Music by George E. Lewis. The book tracks the history of Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, an organization that promoted the development of new jazz styles.
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 28, 2006 — What kid wouldn't like a comforting, joyful book for a holiday gift? A lot of 'em. For true holiday joy, make sure the books you give are truly enjoyable. Here are suggestions for different ages, stages and interests.
Comments |
Aug 30, 2006 — Photographer William Claxton began making a name for himself in the 1950s, taking photos of some of the world's top jazz artists. Then got the opportunity of a lifetime — he was commissioned to document the American jazz scene at a moment when the genre was at its height.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 6, 2006 — Impulse Records was launched during a golden age of jazz and it featured a variety of legendary artists — from John Coltrane to Ray Charles. Its edgy sound reflected the turbulent politics of the 1960s, the author of a new book about the label says.
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 28, 2006 — William Gottlieb died of a stroke last Sunday at the age of 89. In the '40s, Gottlieb learned photography and took hundreds of shots of the jazz greats of the time. Many of those shots are now well known through album covers, books, and posters. 200 of those photos appear in Gottlieb's book, The Golden Age of Jazz.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jan 19, 2006 — The wet spell in the Pacific Northwest is seen as an opportunity for Nancy Pearl, the Seattle librarian who regularly shares her recommended readings. She shares her list of books for a rainy day.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Jazz from NPR