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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 26, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has arrived in West Africa to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation in Liberia, he says, is "absolutely unprecedented."
 
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August 26, 2014 | NPR · An inquiry in the U.K. has found that more than 1,400 children have been sexually abused by an organized ring of men in the northern English town of Rotherham.
 
August 26, 2014 | NPR · Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen R. Kelly, a visiting professor at Duke University, about how North and South Carolina hope to resolve questions about the border between them. The original border, which was mandated by the British during the colonial era, was never surveyed properly. That's caused headaches ever since the 18th century.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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South Carolina

Apr 18, 2013 — The Lee bothers, Matt and Ted, have written two cookbooks about Southern cuisine, but now they've turned their attention to a more specific region: Charleston, the city they grew up in. Their new book contains recipes and stories from a seafood-centric community with a rich culinary history.
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Oct 20, 2010 — This week, Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol finally arrives in paperback, while Jennie Sanford explores her South Carolina governor husband's fall from grace and Steven Landsburg draws on math, physics and economics to challenge our ideas about what we believe.
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Feb 8, 2010 — Of the recent political scandals involving infidelity — John Edwards, Elliott Spitzer, James McGreevy — one stands out, not for what the politician did, but for what his wife did not do. Jenny Sanford, wife of Gov. Mark Sanford, did not stand by her man in the cameras' glare. Her new memoir explains why.
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Oct 25, 2008 — Author Leonard Todd's new book, Carolina Clay, explores the life, art and legacy of a slave potter named Dave. Todd offers a personal perspective on the history of slavery: His great-great grandfather owned Dave.
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Aug 21, 2007 — An audience-driven online competition — and a panel of expert judges — picked two aspiring novelists from among 2,600 would-be literary lights. Now their books are coming to a Borders near you.
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Aug 10, 2007 — Set in the South Carolina Lowcountry, Between the Tides tells the story of a woman who must deal with her tragic past. Georgia Public Radio's St. John Flynn calls the novel, "Southern fiction at its best."
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Oct 18, 2005 — For years, E.L. Doctorow thought that Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's destructive march to the sea near the end of the Civil War would make for a gripping work of fiction.
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Aug 17, 2005 — One of the members of a 1955, all-black little league baseball team from South Carolina will throw the first pitch at this year's Little League World Series. Fifty years ago, the Cannon Street YMCA team was barred, because of race, from playing for the championship.
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