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August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts recently met on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to try to work through issues that have been building up ever since Vladimir Putin returned to the Kremlin.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Sudan

Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of What Is the What by Dave Eggers. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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May 26, 2009 — Dr. James Maskalyk went to contested border town in Sudan with Doctors Without Borders. He treated patients and fended off a measles epidemic with limited resources. His six-month stint affected him more than he expected.
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Oct 23, 2008Tears of the Desert is the first memoir written by a woman caught in the war in Darfur. The author, Halima Bashir, was born into the Zaghawa tribe in the Sudanese desert. She went on to become her village's first formal doctor. But that did not protect her from violence in Darfur.
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Apr 8, 2008 — Sudan's government rarely allows journalists into the Darfur region to cover the brutal conflict, so many try to access Darfur from neighboring Chad. To do so, they use interpreters or fixers — one of whom has written a book about providing the service for Western reporters.
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May 1, 2007 — Actor Don Cheadle, who starred in a movie about the Rwanda genocide of 1994, is urging citizens to speak out to help end suffering in Darfur. He is the co-author of a book that maintains that people can influence their governments to act.
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Nov 1, 2006 — The story of Valentino Achak Deng, one of the tens of thousands of children refugees from the Sudanese civil war, is the basis for Dave Eggers' new novel, What Is the What. Eggers and Deng talk about their collaboration and the traumas the "Lost Boys" endured.
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Nov 4, 2005 — Tim Carney, the last American ambassador to Sudan before the United States downgraded relations in 1997, wants to promote a broader view of the country through a new collection of photographs. NPR foreign correspondent Michele Kelemen reviews Carney's book, Sudan: The Land and the People.
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Jun 18, 2005 — Author Philip Caputo's latest novel, 'Acts of Faith', depicts the effects of the Sudanese civil war on relief workers and missionaries. He notes that sometimes characters with altruistic intentions end up causing great harm.
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Jun 13, 2005 — Three of the "lost boys of Sudan" write about their harrowing experiences fleeing Sudan for a new life in the United States in They Poured Fire on Us From the Sky.
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May 19, 2005 — Journalist and novelist Philip Caputo's new novel, Acts of Faith, is set in Sudan during that country's civil war. It depicts the consequences — intended and otherwise — the conflict has on aid workers and missionaries involved in relief work.
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