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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Environmental conditions

Mar 24, 2013Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation traces the story of a New Jersey town plagued by two generations of toxic waste dumping. Its author, Dan Fagin, talks about the origins of dumping in Toms River and its legacy today.
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Feb 2, 2013 — Zac Unger moved to Churchill, Manitoba, to cover the decline of the polar bear. It was 2008, and the adorable predators had become symbols in the battle over climate change. But the story he ended up writing in his new book was more complicated than he expected.
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Nov 29, 2010 — Thousands of environmental groups have sprung up in China, hoping to protect its land and wildlife from the ravages of economic development. Journalist Jonathan Watts writes about them in a new book, When a Billion Chinese Jump.
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Jan 16, 2010 — Former editor-in-chief of New Scientist magazine predicts that the killer whale will usurp the polar bear as the king of the Arctic by the year 2050.
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Oct 14, 2008 — Fossil fuels are damaging our economy and national security, in addition to altering the world's climate. A green revolution, says Thomas Friedman, "is not about the whales." It's a competitive necessity.
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Sep 8, 2008 — Thomas Friedman is a man bent on revolution. In his new book, Hot, Flat, and Crowded, the three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist writes about the need for a green revolution — and calls upon Americans to lead the charge.
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Jun 15, 2007 — In Florida, Lake Okeechobee's water level dropped enough that dry grasses on the lake floor caught fire. But the weather isn't the only reason for the state's water woes, the author of a new book says.
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Aug 13, 2006 — Feelance writer Philip Connors doubles as a fire lookout in the Gila National Forest in New Mexico. The job lasts six months a year, and gives him a chance to peruse a fair amount of literature. He offers a few recommendations, including the novel Homeland, a series of updates provided to a high school alum newsletter and one of "the funniest things" he's ever read.
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Mar 23, 2006Washington Post reporter Michael Grunwald. His new book is The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise. The Everglades were once considered a wasteland, worthy of being decimated.
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