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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Argentina says it cannot pay certain debts and will fall into default by July 31 if it can't come to an agreement with creditors. This would be Argentina's second default in 13 years.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Even though Spain's economy is out of recession, youth unemployment has hit 57.7 percent. Economists say it could be years before jobs return. By then, many will have missed a decade or more of work.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Israel and Hamas carried out a rhetorical battle Sunday over the fate of dueling offers to extend a ceasefire. In the end, the fighting resumed after Saturday's 12-hour truce. Israel vowed to continue its military campaign, targeting tunnels along the border. Wary Gazans prepared as best they could for the feast that marks the end of Ramadan.
 
July 27, 2014 | NPR · Anne Barnard from The New York Times talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about the differences between the current explosion of violence in Gaza and previous ones.
 
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July 27, 2014 | NPR · The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn't dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Environmental conditions

Mar 24, 2013Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation traces the story of a New Jersey town plagued by two generations of toxic waste dumping. Its author, Dan Fagin, talks about the origins of dumping in Toms River and its legacy today.
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Feb 2, 2013 — Zac Unger moved to Churchill, Manitoba, to cover the decline of the polar bear. It was 2008, and the adorable predators had become symbols in the battle over climate change. But the story he ended up writing in his new book was more complicated than he expected.
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Nov 29, 2010 — Thousands of environmental groups have sprung up in China, hoping to protect its land and wildlife from the ravages of economic development. Journalist Jonathan Watts writes about them in a new book, When a Billion Chinese Jump.
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Jan 16, 2010 — Former editor-in-chief of New Scientist magazine predicts that the killer whale will usurp the polar bear as the king of the Arctic by the year 2050.
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Oct 14, 2008 — Fossil fuels are damaging our economy and national security, in addition to altering the world's climate. A green revolution, says Thomas Friedman, "is not about the whales." It's a competitive necessity.
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Sep 8, 2008 — Thomas Friedman is a man bent on revolution. In his new book, Hot, Flat, and Crowded, the three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist writes about the need for a green revolution — and calls upon Americans to lead the charge.
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Jun 15, 2007 — In Florida, Lake Okeechobee's water level dropped enough that dry grasses on the lake floor caught fire. But the weather isn't the only reason for the state's water woes, the author of a new book says.
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Aug 13, 2006 — Feelance writer Philip Connors doubles as a fire lookout in the Gila National Forest in New Mexico. The job lasts six months a year, and gives him a chance to peruse a fair amount of literature. He offers a few recommendations, including the novel Homeland, a series of updates provided to a high school alum newsletter and one of "the funniest things" he's ever read.
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Mar 23, 2006Washington Post reporter Michael Grunwald. His new book is The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise. The Everglades were once considered a wasteland, worthy of being decimated.
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