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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Central American presidents met with President Obama, discussing the influx of unaccompanied children crossing the border. So far, Obama has not seen eye to eye with Congress on possible solutions.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss U.S. policy options in the Gaza Strip and Rep. Paul Ryan's anti-poverty plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Sayed Kashua is an Arab who writes novels in Hebrew and a sitcom in Arabic. A contradiction? Maybe. But his newest book is a good look at an often-overlooked segment of the Israeli population.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Employment

Mar 20, 2012 — NPR's Jennifer Ludden reviews Liza Mundy's new book, The Richer Sex, which argues that as women out-earn men, the balance of power will shift in the dating scene, the marriage market and family life.
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Mar 19, 2012 — Author and secretary Lynn Peril knows that writing on the job is a time-honored tradition. She recommends three books that were written while the boss was looking the other way. Have you ever composed a novel at your day job? Tell us about it in the comments.
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Mar 18, 2012 — Liza Mundy, author of The Richer Sex, discusses the trend — and implications — of women becoming the primary breadwinners in their families, a phenomenon that cuts across race, class and geographic location.
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Feb 2, 2010 — President Obama recently announced plans to spend nearly $100 billion in 2011 solely on job creation. The proposed budget is aimed at reducing the nation's employment rate of 10 percent. But in a new book, labor activist Gabriel Thompson explores the current job market and takes a look at some of the least-desired jobs that always seem available. Host Michel Martin talks to Thompson about his time spent working undercover in the lettuce fields of Arizona, at an Alabama chicken plant and as a delivery boy in New York City, as chronicled in the book, Working in the Shadows: A Year Doing Jobs (Most) Americans Won't Do.
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Oct 14, 2008 — Author Leslie Chang followed two girls from their rural homes in China to a city called Dongguan, where they became "factory girls." Life in these makeshift cities can be quite lucrative for hard-working ladies, she finds.
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Mar 25, 2008 — In Slavery by Another Name, Douglas Blackmon of the Wall Street Journal argues that slavery did not end in the United States with the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862. He writes that it continued for another 80 years, in what he calls an "Age of Neoslavery."
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Aug 7, 2007 — Research suggests that race plays a significant role in determining whether ex-convicts will succeed in finding employment after being incarcerated. As part of Tell Me More's criminal justice series, Devah Pager, a researcher, talks about the study. Also, Glenn Martin discusses his group's work in helping ex-offenders find jobs with the HIRE Network.
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Oct 31, 2006 — For years, a sociology professor followed workers at a fast-food place in Harlem to see how their lives would unfold. She found that a strong economy and personal connections led some of them to much better jobs than what they started with.
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Jan 7, 2005 — Correspondent Cheryl Devall talks with New York Times reporter Jason DeParle about the struggles of women who have gotten off welfare — a seven-year odyssey he chronicles in his new book American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids, and a Nation's Drive to End Welfare.
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Dec 4, 2004New York Times writer Jason DeParle's book American Dream explores the effects of the 1996 welfare reform enacted by President Clinton and Congress. DeParle and Angela Jobe, a woman featured in the book, join NPR's Scott Simon.
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