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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Employment

Mar 20, 2012 — NPR's Jennifer Ludden reviews Liza Mundy's new book, The Richer Sex, which argues that as women out-earn men, the balance of power will shift in the dating scene, the marriage market and family life.
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Mar 19, 2012 — Author and secretary Lynn Peril knows that writing on the job is a time-honored tradition. She recommends three books that were written while the boss was looking the other way. Have you ever composed a novel at your day job? Tell us about it in the comments.
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Mar 18, 2012 — Liza Mundy, author of The Richer Sex, discusses the trend — and implications — of women becoming the primary breadwinners in their families, a phenomenon that cuts across race, class and geographic location.
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Feb 2, 2010 — President Obama recently announced plans to spend nearly $100 billion in 2011 solely on job creation. The proposed budget is aimed at reducing the nation's employment rate of 10 percent. But in a new book, labor activist Gabriel Thompson explores the current job market and takes a look at some of the least-desired jobs that always seem available. Host Michel Martin talks to Thompson about his time spent working undercover in the lettuce fields of Arizona, at an Alabama chicken plant and as a delivery boy in New York City, as chronicled in the book, Working in the Shadows: A Year Doing Jobs (Most) Americans Won't Do.
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Oct 14, 2008 — Author Leslie Chang followed two girls from their rural homes in China to a city called Dongguan, where they became "factory girls." Life in these makeshift cities can be quite lucrative for hard-working ladies, she finds.
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Mar 25, 2008 — In Slavery by Another Name, Douglas Blackmon of the Wall Street Journal argues that slavery did not end in the United States with the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862. He writes that it continued for another 80 years, in what he calls an "Age of Neoslavery."
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Aug 7, 2007 — Research suggests that race plays a significant role in determining whether ex-convicts will succeed in finding employment after being incarcerated. As part of Tell Me More's criminal justice series, Devah Pager, a researcher, talks about the study. Also, Glenn Martin discusses his group's work in helping ex-offenders find jobs with the HIRE Network.
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Oct 31, 2006 — For years, a sociology professor followed workers at a fast-food place in Harlem to see how their lives would unfold. She found that a strong economy and personal connections led some of them to much better jobs than what they started with.
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Jan 7, 2005 — Correspondent Cheryl Devall talks with New York Times reporter Jason DeParle about the struggles of women who have gotten off welfare — a seven-year odyssey he chronicles in his new book American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids, and a Nation's Drive to End Welfare.
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Dec 4, 2004New York Times writer Jason DeParle's book American Dream explores the effects of the 1996 welfare reform enacted by President Clinton and Congress. DeParle and Angela Jobe, a woman featured in the book, join NPR's Scott Simon.
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