Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Seven years after the subprime mortgage crisis, the U.S. economy has not yet fully recovered. Now two economists have come up with new evidence about what's holding the economy back.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · On Capitol Hill, dogs and their handlers have made the case that all U.S. military dogs should be brought home from war — and treated with the respect they've earned on the battlefield.
 
Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Dozens of children have filed complaints saying they were subjected to inhumane treatment at Border Patrol stations. The complaints center on the holding cells, referred to as "freezers" by migrants.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 24, 2014 | NPR · A United Nations school, which was being used to shelter displaced Gazans awaiting evacuation, came under fire from a missile or shelling. The attack reportedly killed 15 people. Palestinian officials blame Israeli shelling; Israel says it may have been Hamas rockets that fell short of their target.
 
July 24, 2014 | NPR · The war in Gaza is unfolding between Israel and Hamas, but the Palestinian Authority, based in the West Bank, is also involved in efforts to end the fighting. The Palestine Liberation Organization's diplomatic representative to the U.S., Maen Areikat, speaks with Robert Siegel about the causes of the conflict and the possible consequences of a cease-fire.
 
Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · If no contract deal is reached by July 31, Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has warned union workers to plan for a work stoppage the next day.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Advertising

Feb 22, 2012 — Advertisers collect information with every digital move people make. They then target ads based on that information. Communications scholar Joseph Turow worries that advertisers will use such data to discriminate against people and put them into "reputation silos."
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 14, 2010 — Roger Sterling may be the show's most charismatic and lovable characters. His memoir, once a book that existed only in the show's fictional universe, is now real enough to find in your Christmas stocking.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 24, 2010 — Before there was Mad Men, there was From Those Wonderful Folks Who Gave You Pearl Harbor, the cultish and colorful advertising memoir by 1960s ad man Jerry Della Femina that also served as inspiration for AMC's hit series.
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 24, 2010 — Ad man Terry O'Reilly is behind the Canadian radio show and new book The Age of Persuasion. He uses his insider perspective to dissect the world of advertising.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 23, 2009 — Former adman James Othmer spent two decades working in the ad industry as it was in the throes of a dramatic transformation. As more consumers zap commercials on DVRs and read magazines and newspapers online, Othmer has concluded that the Madison Avenue industry as he knew it is dying.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 3, 2006 — Some 130 million people are expected to watch Super Bowl XL on Sunday. As always, advertisers are paying big bucks to grab viewers' attention — and some have resorted to making their spots as strange or unpredictable as possible, says author Warren Berger in his book, Advertising Today.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 16, 2004 — Dr. Marcia Angell is the author of The Truth About Drug Companies. Angell, former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, disputes drug firms' claims that prices are high because profits are used for research and development. Hear Angell and NPR's Jennifer Ludden.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Advertising from NPR