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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Bernard Cornwell

Aug 30, 2012 — Novelist Bernard Cornwell returns to Saxon England while Libyan writer Hisham Matar delivers a tale of loss and Madeline Miller's debut reimagines The Iliad. In nonfiction, Sally Jacobs examines Obama's father, and Jim Steinmeyer recalls a magician who rivaled Houdini.
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Jan 4, 2012 — Historical novelist Bernard Cornwell returns with a new book, while mystery writer Rosamund Lupton makes a gripping debut. In nonfiction, New York Times columnist David Brooks and geopolitical strategist George Friedman look at how history unfolds, while Condoleezza Rice writes for young readers.
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Dec 16, 2011 — These five outstanding novels take us to unfamiliar eras and exotic locales — ancient Israel, Elizabethan England, 1920s Paris — while confirming our common humanity.
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Nov 20, 2010 — It may not be in your history books. But it ended with scores of sunken ships, hundreds of missing soldiers and Revolutionary War hero Paul Revere facing charges of cowardice and incompetence. What went so wrong on the New England coast back in 1779?
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Oct 14, 2010 — Bernard Cornwell recounts a less-than-heroic chapter of American history in his latest novel. The Fort is an exciting account of the failed siege of Penobscot — a mostly forgotten event — and a thoughtful exploration of the absurdity and futility of war.
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Jan 28, 2010 — Bernard Cornwell is one of the kings of historical fiction — his Richard Sharpe novels, about a British soldier in the Napoleonic wars, and Grail Quest series have captivated audiences in the United Kingdom and United States. His new book, The Burning Land — the latest in his series The Saxon Tales — is currently on the bestseller list. NPR's Neal Conan talks with Cornwell about the ninth century, writing historical literature and the new PBS series based on his Sharpe novels.
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Feb 1, 2005 — NPR's Alex Chadwick talks to author Bernard Cornwell about his book The Last Kingdom, a historical novel about the near-demise of England at the hands of the Danish Vikings in the 9th century AD.
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