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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Bill Bryson

Oct 6, 2011 — Philip Roth explores a fictional New Jersey polio epidemic in 1944, while humorist David Sedaris offers animal fables, Isabel Wilkerson looks at black America's Great Migration, Bill Bryson examines the history of private life and Adriana Trigiani channels her grandmothers' wisdom.
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Aug 17, 2011 — Couldn't afford that scuba trip in Indonesia? Didn't have time to hike the Grand Canyon? Fortunately, for those who couldn't quite make it out of town this summer, there's an alternative route for exploration. And all you need is a couch, a cold drink and these three books.
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Oct 14, 2010 — Acclaimed author and travel writer Bill Bryson has pointed his compass at his own house in the English countryside. At Home: A Short History of Private Life, explores the history of the world through the rooms of his home and the objects that fill them.
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Oct 5, 2010 — Bill Bryson is known for exploring far-flung places, but he found inspiration for his most recent book after a hike through his own old, Victorian house in England. At Home: A Short History of Private Life explores the history of domesticity — from making beds, to the long history of hallways.
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Oct 28, 2006 — The noted travel writer has been to many of the Earth's more exotic places. But he returns to familiar territory with a new memoir. The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid takes a warm look at Bryson's formative years in 1950s Des Moines, Iowa.
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Oct 2, 2006 — Leslie, a middle-school teacher who listens to WETA in Washington, D.C., said she had no time for grown-up books until she pulled Bryson's hiking memoir off the shelf.
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Dec 13, 2004 — Librarian Nancy Pearl gets a jump on the winter solstice and Seasonal Affective Disorder (or SAD), that period of the year when many readers fall into a rut of ill humor. She shares her picks for books that beat the winter-weather blues with NPR's Steve Inskeep.
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