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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Deception

Jun 21, 2013 — At No. 11, Ben MacIntyre's Double Cross tells of the D-Day spies who deceived Nazi intelligence.
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May 13, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Tom Reiss explores the inspiration for The Count of Monte Cristo, Ben MacIntyre depicts a World War II effort to fool the Nazis, and Justin Lee recounts his struggle for acceptance as a gay Christian. In fiction, Dennis Lehane imagines a Prohibition-era mobster.
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Aug 10, 2012Double Cross remembers the spies who facilitated the D-Day invasion. It debuts at No. 3.
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Jul 28, 2012 — In his new book Double Cross, Ben MacIntyre recounts the story of the huge deception staged by the Allies before D-Day to hide the invasion target from the Germans. MacIntyre speaks to NPR's Scott Simon about the plan and the eccentric characters who carried it out.
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Sep 8, 2011 — Over the past few weeks, Talk of the Nation has been asking for the books you think should be required reading for all college freshmen. Here are 10 of your suggestions.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Nov 6, 2010Rolling Stone contributing editor Matt Taibbi's columns have been a destination for those trying to understand what happened in the aftermath of the financial meltdown. His new book tries to make the subject even clearer — in the colorful language his readers know well.
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Oct 27, 2010 — In Myla Goldberg's The False Friend, a woman revisits her hometown to atone for a crime that no one remembers. Ten years after Bee Season, Goldberg's compelling new novel examines the nature of childhood trauma, and just how subjective memories can be.
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Jun 12, 2010 — In April of 1943, the body of a British Royal Marine washed ashore in Spain, carrying top secret letters about Allied plans to invade Greece and Sardinia. Or so it seemed. In reality, the body was that of a homeless Welsh laborer, and the letters were fakes designed to direct German attention away from the real Allied invasion target: Sicily.
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Aug 4, 2009 — In his new book, The Liar In Your Life: The Way To Truthful Relationships, Robert Feldman explains how we lie, and why we've developed such a high tolerance for deception. Feldman is associate dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Massachusetts. He's also a professor of psychology there.
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