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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Syria will likely meet an upcoming deadline to hand over its declared chemical weapons. But the agreement seems to have emboldened the Syrian regime to use other brutal tactics, including a chemical not covered by the deal.
 
April 24, 2014 | NPR · As diplomatic talks in Geneva have failed to resolve the three-year-old civil war in Syria, the U.S. is undertaking a new covert program to send weapons in support of rebel forces there.
 
April 24, 2014 | NPR · The Israeli government suspended peace talks with Palestinians, citing a unity agreement announced Wednesday by Palestinian leadership. The Israeli security cabinet came to the decision unanimously, angered by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's decision to end a seven-year schism with the Hamas movement.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Authors, English

Sep 26, 2013 — In his new memoir, Julian Barnes contemplates 19th century photography, the metaphorical exhilaration of ballooning and the sudden death of his beloved wife. Reviewer Heller McAlpin says the book is beautifully written, if a little disjointed.
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Sep 9, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Walter Isaacson records Steve Jobs' official biography, Salman Rushdie remembers hiding for his life and Lynn Povich describes a revolution at Newsweek. In fiction, Michael Chabon tells the story of a struggling California record store and Junot Diaz explores infidelity.
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Mar 11, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Jeanette Winterson revisits her haunting past. In fiction, Mark Haddon's tale of an estranged family's gathering, Glen Duncan's werewolf sequel and Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya's modern-day Antigone arrive in paperback.
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Dec 13, 2012 — 2012 was a very jittery year — what with the presidential election, extreme weather events and the looming "fiscal cliff." Fresh Air critic Maureen Corrigan found that her favorite fiction and nonfiction this year directly confronted the atmospheric uncertainty of the age.
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Oct 1, 2012 — John Powers reviews the author's memoir of his time in hiding — the result of a fatwah calling for his murder after the publication of The Satanic Verses.
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Sep 28, 2012 — In Joseph Anton, Salman Rushdie reflects on how he survived a deadly fatwa. It debuts at No. 2.
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Sep 18, 2012 — In 1989, Iran's leader issued an edict that sentenced Salman Rushdie to death for writing the novel The Satanic Verses. Rushdie reflects on the fallout from that order — from the years spent in hiding to the alias he created to avoid detection — in a new memoir called Joseph Anton.
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Aug 27, 2012 — Juliet Barker has released a new edition of her landmark 1994 biography, The Brontes. Critic Maureen Corrigan says that even the 136 pages of footnotes are "thrilling," as readers are taken "deeper into the everyday realities" of the Brontes' "strange world."
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May 25, 2012 — Not sure what to read? NPR's Susan Stamberg asked three booksellers to share their top five picks for the books you shouldn't miss — tales of con artists, grade-school spies, refugees and ranchers.
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Mar 22, 2012Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?
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