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July 31, 2014 | NPR · In Gaza, the price of drinking water has soared, there's little electricity — and another shortage is beginning: people displaced by the fighting are waiting in long lines to get food.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Single mothers

Jun 26, 2012 — Love knows no bounds, and in these five books, passion leaps from the page. You'll be swept off your feet by three novels and two memoirs that take up the mischievous matters of the heart.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Confessions of Noa Weber by Gail Hareven and Dalya Bilu. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Oct 28, 2010 — Ginni Thomas left a more than minute-long voice mail for Anita Hill, and asked Hill to apologize for accusing her husband — then Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas — of sexual harassment in 1991. Amy Dickinson advises callers on the art and diplomacy of soliciting an apology.
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Dec 4, 2009 — 2009's top works of foreign fiction, as picked by critic Jessa Crispin, feature a geography as wide ranging as their topics: genetic research, civil unrest, sibling resentment, and fairy-tale depictions of government corruption.
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Dec 4, 2009 — In Gail Hareven's novel, feminist and Israeli author Noa Weber turns to her writing to expose an intimate view of the life, love, and obsessions she is embarrassed to share with the world.
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May 7, 2009 — Amy Dickinson doles out advice in her syndicated column "Ask Amy" for the Chicago Tribune. In her memoir, The Mighty Queens of Freeville, she shares some of the mistakes she's made in her life, and how she got through them with advice from the women in her family.
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Apr 3, 2009 — From the moment Noa met Alek, she was stripped of her dignity, unable to resist him. In Gail Hareven's witty, compelling Confessions of Noa Weber, Noa admits the humiliating details to her daughter in hopes of exorcising the demon.
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Aug 10, 2007 — Set in 1930s Texas, Paulette Jiles' second novel is the story of the Stoddard clan — particularly the Stoddard women — who endure storms within their own family and community. Recommended by Stacy Clopton Yates, host of HPPR's High Plains in Words.
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Jul 29, 2005 — For some, the summer is a time to indulge in frothy beach reading: the latest chick lit or globetrotting, highly unbelievable thriller. But book critic Maureen Corrigan has taken a different tack this year: She's catching up on more substantial reading that she hasn't had time for yet.
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Jul 6, 2005 — This Southern novel is named after the first passenger train line to go between New York and Miami and set in the end of the 1950s. The story is told with the backdrop of the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War.
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