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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Last week marked another low-point in the Syrian civil war. A unidentified gunman assassinated a Dutch priest in the city of Homs. Father Frans van der Lugt had lived in Syria for nearly five decades.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Discoveries in science

Nov 27, 2012 — If you're the kind who secretly obsesses about the fundamental nature of reality but wouldn't know a boson if it was delivering roses at your doorstep, I have good news for you.
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Feb 1, 2012 — Novelist David Levithan takes a wry look at adultery, while food writer Jessica Harris takes an African journey, astronomer Mike Brown explains the demotion of planet Pluto, novelist Stephen Amidon probes the human heart with his cardiologist brother, Thomas, and veterinarian Nicholas Dodman offers help for aging dogs.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Dec 2, 2010 — In the information age, the unexplored is hard to come by. Author Richard Harvell recommends three titles to take you back to a time when the unknown was a little more accessible — and to remind you of the power of wonder and imagination.
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Oct 27, 2010 — In fiction, Pete Dexter repays his real-life debt to his stepfather and Tracy Chevalier explores the life of an uneducated woman who became a pioneering 19th century fossil hunter. In nonfiction, there's dish on Google and the 2008 campaign, and Zadie Smith's essays show faith in inconsistency.
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Jan 2, 2010Remarkable Creatures, the new novel by Tracy Chevalier, focuses on the life and work of 19th century fossil hunter Mary Anning, and how her discoveries helped change scientific understanding of the world. Chevalier is the author of Girl with a Pearl Earring.
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Sep 12, 2009 — John Keats' famous 1816 sonnet "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" celebrated the recent discovery of Uranus — the first new planet to be found in more than a thousand years. In fact, says author Richard Holmes, the scientific discoveries of the Romantic age inspired generations of great artists and their work.
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Mar 3, 2009 — Math can do some really neat stuff: From telling us about the existence of Neptune before we could see it, to the black holes we still can't, numbers are capable of a lot of things you didn't learn about in grade school. So why can't they predict economic crises? Commentator Mario Livio will tell you.
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