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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Israel and Hamas carried out a rhetorical battle Sunday over the fate of dueling offers to extend a ceasefire. In the end, the fighting resumed after Saturday's 12-hour truce. Israel vowed to continue its military campaign, targeting tunnels along the border. Wary Gazans prepared as best they could for the feast that marks the end of Ramadan.
 
July 27, 2014 | NPR · Anne Barnard from The New York Times talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about the differences between the current explosion of violence in Gaza and previous ones.
 
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July 27, 2014 | NPR · The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn't dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Discoveries in science

Nov 27, 2012 — If you're the kind who secretly obsesses about the fundamental nature of reality but wouldn't know a boson if it was delivering roses at your doorstep, I have good news for you.
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Feb 1, 2012 — Novelist David Levithan takes a wry look at adultery, while food writer Jessica Harris takes an African journey, astronomer Mike Brown explains the demotion of planet Pluto, novelist Stephen Amidon probes the human heart with his cardiologist brother, Thomas, and veterinarian Nicholas Dodman offers help for aging dogs.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Dec 2, 2010 — In the information age, the unexplored is hard to come by. Author Richard Harvell recommends three titles to take you back to a time when the unknown was a little more accessible — and to remind you of the power of wonder and imagination.
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Oct 27, 2010 — In fiction, Pete Dexter repays his real-life debt to his stepfather and Tracy Chevalier explores the life of an uneducated woman who became a pioneering 19th century fossil hunter. In nonfiction, there's dish on Google and the 2008 campaign, and Zadie Smith's essays show faith in inconsistency.
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Jan 2, 2010Remarkable Creatures, the new novel by Tracy Chevalier, focuses on the life and work of 19th century fossil hunter Mary Anning, and how her discoveries helped change scientific understanding of the world. Chevalier is the author of Girl with a Pearl Earring.
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Sep 12, 2009 — John Keats' famous 1816 sonnet "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" celebrated the recent discovery of Uranus — the first new planet to be found in more than a thousand years. In fact, says author Richard Holmes, the scientific discoveries of the Romantic age inspired generations of great artists and their work.
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Mar 3, 2009 — Math can do some really neat stuff: From telling us about the existence of Neptune before we could see it, to the black holes we still can't, numbers are capable of a lot of things you didn't learn about in grade school. So why can't they predict economic crises? Commentator Mario Livio will tell you.
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