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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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San Francisco

Mar 28, 2014Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore, Robin Sloan's tale of an unusual shopkeeper's secrets, hits half a year on the list.
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Oct 11, 2013 — A secret San Francisco book club meets in Robin Sloan's Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore, at No. 8.
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Jun 3, 2013 — In her new memoir, Fairyland, Alysia Abbott describes her childhood as the daughter of an openly gay father in San Francisco while the gay liberation movement was gaining strength. Her book is based largely on her father's journals, which she found after his death in 1992.
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Apr 1, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Maria Semple chronicles a daughter's search for her missing mother, Jess Walter imagines a glimmering but futile courtship, and Lionel Shriver delivers a tongue-in-cheek take on terrorism. In nonfiction, Victoria Sweet recounts her unusual medical training.
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Oct 11, 2012 — Dr. Victoria Sweet began working at an almshouse more than 20 years ago. She found that the missing component of today's health care system is time — for doctors to care for patients, and for patients to heal. Host Michel Martin speaks with the doctor about her memoir, God's Hotel: A Doctor, A Hospital, And A Pilgrimage To The Heart Of Medicine.
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Mar 20, 2012 — For Iranian-Americans and for others from the Middle East, Central and South Asia, the first day of Spring is also Norouz, the beginning of a New Year.
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Apr 10, 2008 — Once charged with — and acquitted of — the crime of "insulting Turkishness," Elif Shafak examines her roots in her new novel, The Bastard of Istanbul, a book
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Aug 8, 2007 — Lots of you are taking late-summer vacations or devoting weekends to squeezing out the last bits of this lovely season, and we didn't want you do to do it bookless. Here's a late, but still timely, list of summer book recommendations from Day to Day's Karen Grigsby Bates.
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Aug 8, 2007 — What Sara Miles learns about faith, about herself and about the gift of giving and receiving graciously are wonderful gifts for the reader as well. Her memoir is recommended by Day to Day's Karen Grigsby Bates.
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Feb 6, 2007 — When Elif Shafak's novel The Bastard of Istanbul was published in her home country, the best-selling author was accused of "public denigration of Turkishness." She was eventually acquitted.
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