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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Nineteen fifties

Feb 22, 2013 — Appearing at No. 14, John Irving's In One Person is a novel of love, loss and sexuality.
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Jan 29, 2013 — In softcover fiction and nonfiction, John Irving explores teen lust; Denise Mina delivers a murder mystery; David Maraniss looks at the young Barack Obama; Robert Kagan defends U.S. sovereignty; and Susan Cain stands up for introverts.
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Oct 7, 2011 — Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist William Kennedy says his best writing features his New York hometown. His latest book, Chango's Beads and Two-Tone Shoes, is no exception. "There's a richness of Albany that I couldn't possibly exhaust," says Kennedy, who is now 83.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Piano Teacher by Janice Y. K. Lee. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Indignation by Philip Roth. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jan 28, 2010 — Author Gail Godwin's novel, Unfinished Desires, spins a tale of love, envy and reckoning at a Catholic girls' school in North Carolina. Reviewer Jane Ciabattari says the book is a "spellbinding psychological ghost story, near operatic in intensity."
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Mar 3, 2009 — Not always nice, the characters in The Piano Teacher are always interesting. The novel tells a romantic tale of smoky mysteries, near misses, two-faced villains and secretive lovers.
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Feb 1, 2009 — Inspired by a memory of a young boy she saw 30 years ago in West Virginia, Jayne Anne Phillips' new novel, Lark & Termite, has drawn comparisons to The Sound and the Fury.
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Jan 6, 2009 — Maureen Corrigan reviews Jayne Anne Phillips' Lark & Termite, a novel that weaves together the story of an American soldier fighting (and dying) in Korea in 1950, with that of his family struggling with their loss nine years later.
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Sep 15, 2008 — The late-period novels of Philip Roth — arguably, America's greatest living writer — have unflinchingly chronicled the perils of old age. But vibrant youth is at the center of Roth's newest work, making its hard truths all the more resonant — and crushing.
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