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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Nineteen fifties

Feb 22, 2013 — Appearing at No. 14, John Irving's In One Person is a novel of love, loss and sexuality.
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Jan 29, 2013 — In softcover fiction and nonfiction, John Irving explores teen lust; Denise Mina delivers a murder mystery; David Maraniss looks at the young Barack Obama; Robert Kagan defends U.S. sovereignty; and Susan Cain stands up for introverts.
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Oct 7, 2011 — Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist William Kennedy says his best writing features his New York hometown. His latest book, Chango's Beads and Two-Tone Shoes, is no exception. "There's a richness of Albany that I couldn't possibly exhaust," says Kennedy, who is now 83.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Piano Teacher by Janice Y. K. Lee. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Indignation by Philip Roth. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jan 28, 2010 — Author Gail Godwin's novel, Unfinished Desires, spins a tale of love, envy and reckoning at a Catholic girls' school in North Carolina. Reviewer Jane Ciabattari says the book is a "spellbinding psychological ghost story, near operatic in intensity."
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Mar 3, 2009 — Not always nice, the characters in The Piano Teacher are always interesting. The novel tells a romantic tale of smoky mysteries, near misses, two-faced villains and secretive lovers.
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Feb 1, 2009 — Inspired by a memory of a young boy she saw 30 years ago in West Virginia, Jayne Anne Phillips' new novel, Lark & Termite, has drawn comparisons to The Sound and the Fury.
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Jan 6, 2009 — Maureen Corrigan reviews Jayne Anne Phillips' Lark & Termite, a novel that weaves together the story of an American soldier fighting (and dying) in Korea in 1950, with that of his family struggling with their loss nine years later.
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Sep 15, 2008 — The late-period novels of Philip Roth — arguably, America's greatest living writer — have unflinchingly chronicled the perils of old age. But vibrant youth is at the center of Roth's newest work, making its hard truths all the more resonant — and crushing.
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