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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · After the Liberian government ordered a quarantine of one of the poorest neighborhoods in its capital, Monrovia, residents there woke up to find themselves cut off from the rest of the city by security forces. By midday, the neighborhood was in riot.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Both sides have traded barbs and criticism over the other's policies. Some believe the public feud stems from a personal animosity between President Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Corporations

Jan 8, 2014 — In softcover nonfiction, William Knoedelseder looks at the family behind Budweiser, Charles Duhigg delves into the science of habit, Fred Kaplan explores an Army revolution, and Whole Foods' founder argues for businesses pursuing a higher purpose. In fiction, George Saunders delivers a collection of fantastical stories.
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Aug 5, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, David Randall examines the science of sleep, and Susannah Cahalan falls prey to a mysterious disease. In fiction, Claire Vaye Watkins explores the American West, and Ivan Doig looks at a single dad whose world is upended.
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Mar 26, 2013 — The rich and good-looking get a taste of life among the 99 percent in Jonathan Dee's novels. In A Thousand Pardons, his protagonist, Helen Armstead, finds a secret talent for getting powerful men to apologize after her marriage falls apart and she is forced to enter the working world.
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Jan 16, 2013 — The outspoken Whole Foods founder tells us why he hates "Obamacare" and why we have trouble cutting the sugar, fat and salt out of our diets. But now he's told CBS he used a poor choice of words when referring to the health law as fascism.
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Sep 29, 2011 — As companies have moved away from traditional pension plans, they've been shifting employees to 401(k)s that transfer the cost — and the risk — to workers. Companies have claimed for years that old-style pensions were unsustainable. But author Ellen Schultz says the shift has helped firms boost their bottom lines.
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Aug 30, 2008 — Jacqueline Carey talks about her new novel, It's a Crime. The novelist found inspiration in affluent New Jersey suburbs, just outside of Manhattan, and in the white-collar crimes of corporate CEOs.
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Jan 27, 2008 — In his first legal thriller in three years, John Grisham explores a tainted Mississippi judicial system where Supreme Court justices are bought and sold. The Appeal serves as a cautionary tale about political corruption.
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Jan 15, 2008 — Alan Cheuse makes a prediction for forthcoming novels from John Grisham and Stephen King. Grisham's The Appeal centers on a $41 million jury award to a Mississippi woman whose family died at the hands of a chemical company; King's Duma Key features an evil genie who goes after a man in the Florida Keys.
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Aug 27, 2006 — Charles Johnson is a renowned novelist, essayist and writer of short stories. His novel Middle Passage won the 1990 National Book Award. Lately, his own reading has been directed at an upcoming historical work.
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Jan 13, 2006Time magazine called him one of the world's 100 Most Powerful and Influential People. John Bogle is the founder of the Vanguard Group of mutual funds and the author of new book, The Battle for The Soul of Capitalism.
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