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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Allegories

Oct 28, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Tracy Chevalier follows an English Quaker across the Atlantic, Herman Koch serves a meal with a hefty helping of unease and Peter Sis brings an ancient flock of birds into the 21st century. In nonfiction, Jared Diamond mines lessons from traditional societies.
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Dec 17, 2012 — If the conspiracy theorists are right, we only have a few more days before the end of the world. Author Ben H. Winters describes his favorite pre-apocalyptic works of fiction. Do you have a favorite doomsday masterpiece? Tell us in the comments.
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Nov 16, 2011 — Author and illustrator Peter Sis is known for his fantastical children's books, but his latest project is meant for more grown-up imaginations. Adapted from a 12th century Persian poem, The Conference of the Birds tells the story of thousands of birds who together fly off in search of their king.
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Nov 2, 2011 — Czech-born artist Peter Sis makes a case for the printed page with a gorgeously illustrated retelling of a 12th century Sufi poem. In The Conference of the Birds, Sis crafts a richly inked parable of a flight of birds that speaks to the painful but beautiful human journey toward understanding.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Union Dues by John Sayles. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Sunlight Dialogues by John Gardner and Charles Johnson. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Return of the Player by Michael Tolkin. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jan 3, 2011 — In our daily barrage of information, real insight can be hard to come by — it's easy to become overwhelmed or uninspired by our endless consumption of facts. Author Gish Jen recommends three fable-like fictions that reveal the fanciful side of daily realities.
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Jun 4, 2007 — Summer is the season we can finally tackle the books that have been piling up on our desks and forming small mountains on the floor. Book critic Alan Cheuse offers a selection of some of the best books of late spring and early summer, and some classics that are always present in his literary landscape.
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Jun 4, 2007 — Book critic Alan Cheuse describes John Gardner's signature 1972 novel as a "dramatic encounter between modern life and ancient mythology." Largely known for his books about the art of writing, Gardner's own fiction is showcased in this upstate New York epic, Cheuse says.
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