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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely-watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · On Sunday, Iraqi and Kurdish forces broke a nearly 80-day siege by the Islamic State on the town of Amerli, where residents now have enough food and water for the first time in weeks.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. military's attention to PTSD is well-documented but Kurdish fighters living with the same disorder haven't received nearly as much care. Arun Rath talks to journalist Jenna Krajeski.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to journalist Shane Harris about his Foreign Policy story on "Lady al-Qaida," Aafia Siddiqui. The Pakistani-born woman was arrested in Afghanistan in 2008.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Allegories

Oct 28, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Tracy Chevalier follows an English Quaker across the Atlantic, Herman Koch serves a meal with a hefty helping of unease and Peter Sis brings an ancient flock of birds into the 21st century. In nonfiction, Jared Diamond mines lessons from traditional societies.
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Dec 17, 2012 — If the conspiracy theorists are right, we only have a few more days before the end of the world. Author Ben H. Winters describes his favorite pre-apocalyptic works of fiction. Do you have a favorite doomsday masterpiece? Tell us in the comments.
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Nov 16, 2011 — Author and illustrator Peter Sis is known for his fantastical children's books, but his latest project is meant for more grown-up imaginations. Adapted from a 12th century Persian poem, The Conference of the Birds tells the story of thousands of birds who together fly off in search of their king.
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Nov 2, 2011 — Czech-born artist Peter Sis makes a case for the printed page with a gorgeously illustrated retelling of a 12th century Sufi poem. In The Conference of the Birds, Sis crafts a richly inked parable of a flight of birds that speaks to the painful but beautiful human journey toward understanding.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Union Dues by John Sayles. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Sunlight Dialogues by John Gardner and Charles Johnson. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Return of the Player by Michael Tolkin. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jan 3, 2011 — In our daily barrage of information, real insight can be hard to come by — it's easy to become overwhelmed or uninspired by our endless consumption of facts. Author Gish Jen recommends three fable-like fictions that reveal the fanciful side of daily realities.
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Jun 4, 2007 — Summer is the season we can finally tackle the books that have been piling up on our desks and forming small mountains on the floor. Book critic Alan Cheuse offers a selection of some of the best books of late spring and early summer, and some classics that are always present in his literary landscape.
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Jun 4, 2007 — Book critic Alan Cheuse describes John Gardner's signature 1972 novel as a "dramatic encounter between modern life and ancient mythology." Largely known for his books about the art of writing, Gardner's own fiction is showcased in this upstate New York epic, Cheuse says.
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